embryonal tumor

em·bry·o·nal tu·mor

, embryonic tumor
a neoplasm, usually malignant, which arises during intrauterine or early postnatal development from an organ rudiment or immature tissue; it forms immature structures characteristic of the part from which it arises, and may form other tissues as well. The term includes neuroblastoma and Wilms tumor, and is also used to include certain neoplasms presenting in later life, this usage being based on the belief that such tumors arise from embryonic rests.
See also: teratoma.
Synonym(s): embryoma

em·bry·o·nal tu·mor

, embryonic tumor (em'brē-ōn'ăl tū'mŏr, em'brē-on'ik)
A neoplasm, usually malignant, which arises during intrauterine or early postnatal development from an organ rudiment or immature tissue. It forms immature structures characteristic of the part from which it arises and may form other tissues as well. The term includes neuroblastoma and Wilms tumor and is also used to include certain neoplasms presenting in later life, this usage being based on the belief that such tumors arise from embryonic rests, which are fragments of embryonic tissue that are still present after the embryonic period.
See also: teratoma
Synonym(s): embryoma.
References in periodicals archive ?
Embryonal tumor with multilayered rosettes: Two case reports with a review of the literature.
In contrast to GBMs, those previously designated as PNETs, incorporated into the term embryonal tumor with multilayered rosettes (ETMR) in the 2016 WHO classification system for CNS tumors, are aggressive neoplasms, with medulloblastoma-like histology, and mostly affect the pediatric population.
This trio of uniformly aggressive embryonal neoplasms, including the embryonal tumor with abundant neuropil and true rosettes, the ependymoblastoma, and the medulloepithelioma, are histologically united by the shared feature of lumen-forming, multilayered, ependymoblastic" rosettes.
A finding of 0.6 cm focus of scarring with calcification likely representing burnt-out primary embryonal tumor versus differentiation at the site of metastasis was a possible explanation [18].
Wilm's tumor is the most common embryonal tumor in patients with BWS followed by hepatoblastoma.
The atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) is a clinically aggressive embryonal tumor of infancy that occurs in the posterior fossa and cerebral hemispheres.
The AT/RT is an aggressive, malignant, embryonal tumor most commonly composed of epithelioid cells with round nuclei and prominent nucleoli with frequent mitotic figures.
Medulloblastoma is a malignant embryonal tumor of the cerebellum, accounting for 14% of all pediatric central nervous system tumors, (3) and it is one of the so-called malignant small blue cell tumors bearing histological similarity to SCC.
The medulloblastoma (MDB) is defined as a malignant, invasive embryonal tumor of the cerebellum, preferentially occurring in children and adolescents, with a propensity for leptomeningeal dissemination.
The most important differential diagnoses of lymphangiomas include hemangiomas, intraspinal arachnoid cysts, neurilemomas, meningotheliomas, lipomas, embryonal tumors, enterogenous cysts, metastatic tumors, and other rare intraspinal tumors such as hemangiopericytomas.