embryology

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Related to embryologic: Embryologic origin

embryology

 [em″bre-ol´o-je]
the science of the development of the individual during the embryonic stage and, by extension, in several or even all preceding and subsequent stages of the life cycle. adj., adj embryolog´ic.

em·bry·ol·o·gy

(em'brē-ol'ŏ-jē),
Science of the origin and development of the organism from fertilization of the oocyte to the end of the eighth week. Usually used to include all stages of prenatal life.
[embryo- + G. logos, study]

embryology

(ĕm′brē-ŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The branch of biology that deals with the formation, early growth, and development of living organisms.
2. The embryonic structure or development of a particular organism.

em′bry·o·log′ic (-ə-lŏj′ĭk), em′bry·o·log′i·cal adj.
em′bry·o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
em′bry·ol′o·gist n.

em·bry·ol·o·gy

(em'brē-ol'ŏ-jē)
Science of the origin and development of the organism from fertilization of the oocyte to the end of the eighth week and, by extension, all subsequent stages up to birth.
[embryo- + G. logos, study]

embryology

The branch of science concerned with the process of physical development of the body, from the time of fertilization of the egg (ovum) to the time of birth.

embryology

the study of the developing EMBRYO in animals or plants.

em·bry·ol·o·gy

(em'brē-ol'ŏ-jē)
Science of the origin and development of the organism from fertilization of the oocyte to the end of the eighth week.
[embryo- + G. logos, study]
References in periodicals archive ?
Ecchordosis physaliphora are ectopic, extraosseous notochordal lesions of embryologic origin, similar to notochordal vestiges of the intervertebral disk.
Certainly, this conclusion is not unreasonable, because these anatomic sites have a common embryologic origin.
(1) It is considered to arise during embryologic development of the gastrointestinal tract.
The bilateral nature of our patient's condition speaks in favor of a developmental abnormality or a more complex (albeit mild) embryologic process as the cause, (11) as has already been suggested.
In normal development most of the embryologic mammary ridges resolve, except for 2 segments in the pectoral region, which later become breasts.
(1) As a derivative of the third pharyngeal pouch, thymic remnants may occur at any point along the path of descent of the thymus into the mediastinum during embryologic development.
They all arise from a lack of regression of a dural diverticulum in the prenasal space that extends through the embryologic foramen cecum or the fonticulus frontalis.
The close relationship between the mullerian ducts, which fuse to form the uterus, and the mesonephros during embryologic life supports this proposed origin.[4] Remnants of implanted mesonephric duct tissue, derived during mullerian duct fusion, may account for the origin of uterine or cervical EWT.
(4) These lesions are the result of an embryologic abnormality of the vascular system.
The tympanic membrane is formed by the fusion of three embryologic layers: the endoderm, the mesoderm, and the ectoderm.
Early embryologic duplication of the hindgut could cause complete duplication of the 2 systems.
These complexes are embryologic structures found in the pancreas of humans as well as some animals.