embolus


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Related to embolus: thromboembolus

embolus

 [em´bo-lus] (pl. em´boli) (Gr.)
a clot or other plug, usually part or all of a thrombus, brought by the blood from another vessel and forced into a smaller one, thus obstructing circulation; see also embolism.
Embolus impacted at the site of branching of an artery. From Dorland's, 2000.
saddle embolus one situated at the bifurcation of a large artery, sometimes blocking both branches.

em·bo·lus

, pl.

em·bo·li

(em'bō-lŭs, -lī),
1. A plug, composed of a detached thrombus or vegetation, mass of bacteria, or other foreign body, occluding a vessel.
2. Synonym(s): emboliform nucleus
[G. embolos, a plug, wedge or stopper]

embolus

(ĕm′bə-ləs)
n. pl. embo·li (-lī′)
A mass, such as an air bubble, a detached blood clot, or a foreign body, that travels through the bloodstream and lodges so as to obstruct or occlude a blood vessel.

em·bo·lus

, pl. emboli (em'bŏ-lŭs, -lī)
1. A plug, composed of a detached thrombus or vegetation, mass of bacteria, quantity of air or gas or foreign body, which occludes a vessel.
2. Synonym(s): emboliform nucleus.
[G. embolos, a plug, wedge or stopper]

embolus

Any material carried in the bloodstream to a point where it causes obstruction to the blood flow. Emboli are commonly blood clots but may consist of crystals of CHOLESTEROL from plaques of ATHEROMA in larger arteries, clumps of infected material, air or nitrogen, bone marrow, fat or tumour cells.

Embolus

An embolus (or emboli the plural form) is a blood clot that has detached from its site of origin and travels to the lungs (pulmonary artery), where it can rupture the artery, causing death.

em·bo·lus

, pl. emboli (em'bō-lŭs, -lī)
1. A plug, composed of a detached thrombus or vegetation, mass of bacteria, quantity of air or gas or foreign body, which occludes a vessel.
2. Synonym(s): emboliform nucleus.
[G. embolos, a plug, wedge or stopper]
References in periodicals archive ?
The incidence of pulmonary embolus is slightly less than gastric leak or postoperative bleeding, but the chance of death is greater, in part because there is time to treat a gastric leak or bleeding with further surgery, whereas a massive pulmonary embolus can cause sudden death.
The primary learning objectives of this program are identifying those patients at risk for pulmonary embolus, recognizing the variable clinical presentation of patients, and understanding the utility and limitations of diagnostic imaging.
The clinical symptoms of cerebral air embolus are myriad and can exhibit symptoms resembling stroke or acute cerebral infection.
Mori, "Shotgun pellet embolus in the cerebral circulation via the internal carotid artery in the neck; a case report," Journal of Neurological Surgery, vol.
The male palp has a slender embolus with a straight tip and a narrow RTA that ends in a tooth-like process (Figs 14, 15).
4.: A transesophageal echocardiography demonstrating pulmonary artery tumour embolus involving right pulmonary artery.
Gephyroctenus contains eight species and can be distinguished by the following synapomorphies: a cymbial retrolateral groove, retrolateral origin of embolus, long and thin embolus, median apophysis with a subdistal hook, hyaline projection close to the embolus base in the male palp, fused median and lateral fields in a single epigynal plate, copulatory opening located dorsally in an atrium, and elongated copulatory ducts surrounding the spermathecae in the female epigynum (Polotow & Brescovit 2008).
Polite determined that the incidence of deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolus was 0.14% during the 2 years prior to diagnosis of colon cancer and 0.07% during the 2 years prior to diagnosis of breast cancer.
In 1958, Gill and Dammin[14] reported a case of renal failure caused by a paradoxical embolus through a patent foramen ovale.
In the case of our patient, interventional radiology and cardiothoracic surgery were consulted for retrieval of the cement embolus. Both services believed that the risk of retrieval was greater than the potential complications that may arise from allowing the cement material to remain in situ, especially in light of the patient's significant comorbidities.
[sup][3] (2) The embolus occludes the artery and leads to ischemia distal to the embolus, which leads to an increase in the amount of interstitial fluid in the lung.
One woman, with a history of known thrombophilia, suffered a large pulmonary embolus on postoperative day 12 but recovered fully.