embalm


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em·balm

(em-bahlm'),
To treat a cadaver with balsams or other chemicals to preserve it from decay.
[L. in, in, + balsamum, balsam]

em·balm

(em-bahlm')
To treat a dead body with chemicals to preserve it from decay.
[L. in, in, + balsamum, balsam]
References in periodicals archive ?
It comes as more serious problems involving bodies not being embalmed by the firm were uncovered in the Midlands.
In part it read: "Hereafter no persons will be permitted to embalm or remove the bodies of deceased officers or soldiers unless acting under the special license of the Provost Marshal of the Army, Department, or District in which the bodies may be.
He also had to contend with the complaints of his customers, who were dissatisfied for example with the visual appearance of the embalmed corpse, in particular the face.
However, as new rules governing the practice are introduced, the HSE says it was never an official service offered by its mortuary staff and from November 1 undertakers who wish to embalm at the hospital will have to have a legal agreement.
The final train ride of Abraham Lincoln's embalmed body form Washington, D.C., to Illinois raised awareness even more.
Kamm says that it takes him two to three hours to embalm and dress a body.
For example, if the family of a deceased wants to send a professional from the UK to Spain to embalm the body, the Directive would ensure they can do so, he said.
The cost of embalming, for example, ranged from $200 to $575, in spite of the fact that the time needed to embalm a body and the cost of the materials used is the same from one provider to another.
If a funeral home discarded, say, 3.5 gallons of the stuff--roughly the amount needed to embalm the average adult--the EPA could slap it with a fine.
At that point--not wanting to tempt fate further--the community decided to embalm the precious relic.