emancipated minor


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A person under the age of majority—adulthood—who is regarded in the eyes of the law as being old enough—usually by virtue of marriage or financial independence—to make adult decisions and exercise general control over his or her own life

e·man·ci·pa·ted mi·nor

(ē-man'si-pā-tĕd mī'nŏr)
A young person who is legally entitled to be treated as an adult through a court order, marriage, military service, or being a parent.

emancipated minor

A person not of legal age who is in the armed services, married, the mother of a child whether married or not, or has left home and is self-sufficient. Some state legislatures do not require such a person to have parental consent to receive medical or surgical care, or advice on contraception or abortion.
See also: minor
References in periodicals archive ?
(96) A court might modify or terminate such an emancipation if, for example, the emancipated minor was unadvisedly alienating his property or was being taken advantage of by others.
Most legal cases to date have upheld the following general principles: (a) the right to an abortion as an extension of constitutionally guaranteed personal freedoms; (b) consultation of a minor's parents/guardian in non-emergency cases; and (c) at least an attempt to consult parents unless dealing with an emancipated minor (Holder, 1977; Rosoff, 1981).
Justice Stevens agreed with the Court's judgment that the Utah law is constitutional as applied to immature and dependent minors, but in a separate opinion he argued that the Court should have considered the broader issue of whether a state may require notice to parents even for mature and emancipated minors. He indicated that he would uphold such a statute on the ground that it serves the state's interest in ensuring that the minor's abortion decision is wisely made.
More than half of the states have enacted laws enabling legally emancipated minors to consent to all kinds of medical care.
Parental authority issues surround the use of the terms "emancipated minor" and "mature minor," whereas concerns about obligations to test center around the confusion over the medical benefits of genetic testing (Clayton, 1995).
Procedural guidelines for minors, emancipated minors, parents, providers, and institutions are presented.
"The passage of this bill helps ensure the only marriages going forward are adults or emancipated minors," Smoot said.
the exceptions that some states recognize for emancipated minors
(21,22) Second, minors who bear certain legal statuses may consent to their own health care, including emancipated minors, minors living away from home and responsibly managing their own finances, and teens who are married, pregnant or parents.
Emancipated minors are one category of abortion-seekers who have had success in challenging parental consent and notification laws.
Homeless adolescents are considered emancipated minors,
To comply with changes in the law, the form includes new questions concerning youth in foster care after age 12, emancipated minors, those in legal guardianship and homeless youth or those in danger of becoming homeless.