emancipated minor


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emancipated minor

[iman′sipā′tid]
Etymology: L, emancipare, to set free
a person who is not legally an adult but who, because he or she is married, in the military, or otherwise no longer dependent on the parents, may not require parental permission for medical or surgical care. State and national laws vary in specific interpretations of the rule.
A person under the age of majority—adulthood—who is regarded in the eyes of the law as being old enough—usually by virtue of marriage or financial independence—to make adult decisions and exercise general control over his or her own life

e·man·ci·pa·ted mi·nor

(ē-man'si-pā-tĕd mī'nŏr)
A young person who is legally entitled to be treated as an adult through a court order, marriage, military service, or being a parent.

emancipated minor

A person not of legal age who is in the armed services, married, the mother of a child whether married or not, or has left home and is self-sufficient. Some state legislatures do not require such a person to have parental consent to receive medical or surgical care, or advice on contraception or abortion.
See also: minor
References in periodicals archive ?
To protect third parties with whom the emancipated minor may deal during the pendency of any such appeal, the code expressly provides that "[t]he validity of an act of the minor shall not be affected by the subsequent modification or termination of the judgment.
Most legal cases to date have upheld the following general principles: (a) the right to an abortion as an extension of constitutionally guaranteed personal freedoms; (b) consultation of a minor's parents/guardian in non-emergency cases; and (c) at least an attempt to consult parents unless dealing with an emancipated minor (Holder, 1977; Rosoff, 1981).
The flexibility shown with respect to emancipated minors by some courts, discussed above in Part II, could be extended to other categories of minors.
Category Four: Good language comprehension, sufficient decisional capacity--mature but not emancipated minors
Item XX deals with issues of confidentiality in general and for minors in particular, clarifying the status of emancipated minors and the emancipating situation.
Provision of a web learning platform for languages available at all Walloon citizens over 18 years and to emancipated minors and minors in alternating training.
6) Since that ruling has not been appealed, he said, the state is presently barred from notifying the parents of emancipated minors who seek abortions.
Some adolescents, depending on the state, are legally recognized as emancipated minors on the basis of marriage, parenthood, military service, consent of parents (for example, adolescents who are "thrown away" by parents after family conflicts), judicial order of emancipation, or financial independence.
Generally, adolescents who are living independently of their parents or married are considered emancipated minors and are permitted to make medical decisions as adults (Buchanan & Brock, 1989).
The first is the recommendation that emancipated minors be empowered to refuse life-sustaining treatment that they regard as an excessive burden, but only with the approval of a bioethics review committee.
Married or legally emancipated minors are exempted from notification requirements.
The same holds true with emancipated minors who are 14 or 15 - even if they are not enrolled in school.