ellipsis


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el·lip·sis

(ē-lip'sis),
Omission of words or ideas, leaving the whole to be completed by the reader or listener.
[G. ek-, out, + leipsis, leaving]

ellipsis

[ilip′sis]
(in psychiatry) the omission by a patient of meaningful thoughts and ideas while undergoing therapy.

ellipsis

(ē-lĭp′sĭs) [L. ellīpsis fr. Gr., a falling short, defective]
In psychoanalysis, omission by the patient of important words or ideas during treatment.
References in periodicals archive ?
One reviewer observed of Joseph Conrad and Ford Madox Ford's The Inheritors, a collaborative novel with over 400 instances of ellipsis points, that the authors had "cheated" the publisher and the public "who paid for a full six-shilling novel with words all solid on the page.
To this complication, Toner adds the slow acceptance of ellipsis by grammarians, questions of how it would be marked (e.
They point out five main cohesive devices in English: reference, substitution, ellipsis, conjunction, and lexical cohesion.
When quoting someone especially, it is important to signify an ellipsis with a series of three evenly spaced dots: "I don't .
To promote the change, organisers attached a poster on the Ellipsis Eclipses sculpture outside the leisure complex.
with the three-point ellipsis used to indicate a gap within a sentence and the four-point one used to indicate a gap between complete sentences.
So in fact," I said, sounding quite impressed, "your construction was a double ellipsis.
Also recommended from Ellipsis Press is "Shadowplay"(9780963753632, $13.
It has been demonstrated that ellipsis sites (orphans) are interpreted relative to their antecedents (cf.
But those ellipsis points represent 22 words that the writer packed between his subject and his verb.
So come Monday, try to talk about the colon without sniggering and remember, as Rubin reminds us on a T-shirt, that an ellipsis is not what happens when the moon passes in front of the sun.