ellipsis


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el·lip·sis

(ē-lip'sis),
Omission of words or ideas, leaving the whole to be completed by the reader or listener.
[G. ek-, out, + leipsis, leaving]

ellipsis

(ē-lĭp′sĭs) [L. ellīpsis fr. Gr., a falling short, defective]
In psychoanalysis, omission by the patient of important words or ideas during treatment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ellipsis spokesperson David points out, "We're very mindful of the importance of separation between consulting (Ellipsis) and solutions (Beyonde).
According to the company, forming a core system in both entities, SimCorp Dimension will be used for the middle and back office management of listed derivatives and OTC at Exane Derivatives, as well as in the front and middle office operations at Ellipsis Asset Management.
However if this sounds cut and dried, Parkes goes on to suggest that the precise function of dash and ellipsis can vary considerably from writer to writer.
It is indeed a reasonable assumption that rules operating within sentential bounds can be easily reconciled with syntactic effects, if for no other reason than the overarching theme of sentential integrity, to the point of positing structural identity with an antecedent and even syntactic reconstruction of the ellipsis. In principle, there are no good grounds for so separating sluices, however, inasmuch as embedding or lack thereof does not seem to alter the mechanism itself.
In fact, raise a glass to the entire Gang of Eleven: apostrophe, brackets, colon, comma, dash, ellipsis, exclamation point, hyphen, parentheses, period, question mark, quotation mark and semicolon.
Ellipsis Media has designed, built and maintained the site.
To emphasize the importance of ellipsis, I mention to students how Tiger Woods goes through his swing in slow motion, carefully minding what otherwise goes by too quickly.
To explain ellipsis in children's productions we need to consider a range of factors that may influence it, as well as changes in patterns of ellipsis over the course of acquisition.
Rubinek has created a cinematic ellipsis that allows the audience to arrive at its own perception of the story.
The fifty-first and fifty-second have just appeared in Ellipsis: Literature and Art and Snake River Reflections, respectively.
The brevity and form of the word ici suggest to this reader the form of the ellipsis (the three points de suspension) that characterizes Sarraute's writing: "Tout ce qui sort d'ici se reflechit .
His work -- including Blindness (1926), Living (1929), Party Going (1939), Caught (1943), Back (1946), and Concluding (1948) -- is characterized by an unconventional use of language, influenced in part by Gertrude Stein in its ellipsis and distortion of syntax.