elixir

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hydroalcoholic

 [hi″dro-al″kah-hol´ik]
pertaining to or containing both water and alcohol.

e·lix·ir

(ē-lik'sĭr),
A clear, sweetened, hydroalcoholic liquid intended for oral use; elixirs contain flavoring substances and are used either as vehicles or for the therapeutic effect of the active medicinal agents.
[Mediev. L., fr. Ar. al- iksir, the philosopher's stone]

elixir

/elix·ir/ (e-lik´ser) a clear, sweetened, alcohol-containing, usually hydroalcoholic liquid containing flavoring substances and sometimes active medicinal ingredients.

elixir

(ĭ-lĭk′sər)
n.
1. A sweetened aromatic solution of alcohol and water, serving as a vehicle for medicine.
2.
a. See philosophers' stone.
b. A substance believed to maintain life indefinitely. Also called elixir of life.
c. A substance or medicine believed to have the power to cure all ills.
3. An underlying principle.

elixir

[ilik′sər]
Etymology: Ar, il-iksir, seen as the philosopher's stone
a clear liquid containing water, alcohol, sweeteners, or flavors, used primarily as a vehicle for the oral administration of a drug.

e·lix·ir

(elix.) (ĕ-lik'sĭr)
A clear, sweetened, hydroalcoholic liquid intended for oral use; elixirs contain flavoring substances and are used either as vehicles or for the therapeutic effect of the active medicinal agents.
[Mediev. L., fr. Ar. al-iksir, the philosopher's stone]

Elixir

A sweetened liquid that contains alcohol, water, and medicine.

e·lix·ir

(ĕ-lik'sĭr)
Clear, sweetened, flavored, hydroalcoholic liquid intended for oral use either as vehicle or for therapeutic effect of active medicinal agents.
[Mediev. L., fr. Ar. al-iksir, the philosopher's stone]

elixir (ēlik´sur),

n a pleasantly flavored, sweetened hydroalcoholic solution of a drug intended for oral administration.

elixir

a clear, sweetened, usually hydroalcoholic liquid containing flavoring substances and sometimes active medicinal ingredients, for oral use.
References in periodicals archive ?
Emerson in "Worship" allows himself to acknowledge the value in being informed by another's thought; Hawthorne in The Elixir of Life confronts the dangers of a spiritual identity formed around isolation, and in Clarel, Melville shows us the complexities of an individual spiritual crisis through the title character's interactions with others.
Fehied Bin Fahad Al Shareef said that accelerated increase in population all over the world has re- duced natural resources of potable water and has created widening gap between requirement and available elixir of life.
Maybe some new body parts or some civility or the elixir of life or leg warmers.
Often described as an elixir of life, liquorice has been used for centuries for its nutritive and rejuvenating properties and it is, still today, one of the most universally consumed herbs.
Other details are less grim: during the 17th century, the gates of St Bart's were a popular haunt for quacks, and you could pick up an Elixir of Life there (and get your syphilis cured).
He concentrates on two enduring themes, the transmutation of elements and the search for an elixir of life that will cure all illness and reverse aging.
If the elixir of life was not available, then Sweet Thai Chilli Crisps.
Keats' poetry contains several examples of the poet introducing some sort of substance, an elixir of life, into objects in order to imbue them with life.
By Mike Derderian Star Staff Writer After reading Written in English by two Jordanian students, Laith Shalan and Karim Ghawi, The Elixir of Life is a short story that is both admirable and commendable especially that both students spent a considerable amount of time writing it.
00pm (1971) (15) Disfigured genius Dr Phibes returns from the grave to search for an elixir of life which he hopes can resurrect his beloved wife - but ends up tangling with a fiendish Egyptologist equally keen to claim the prize.
The pub, which I shall call the Whippet Inn (if only for the purpose of resurrecting a joke that might otherwise expire through old age), serves four real ales in self-refilling glasses, along with the occasional barrel of the elixir of life (to be served only in half pints and not to under-18s).
IN-FUSIO has said that Tomb Raider mobile features three episodes - The Osiris Codex, The Quest for Cinnabar and The Elixir of Life - and the game will be available in multiple languages - English, French, Italian, German Spanish, French and Chinese.