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electron

 [e-lek´tron]
any of the negatively charged particles arranged in orbitals around the nucleus of an atom and determining all of the atom's physical and chemical properties except mass and radioactivity. Electrons flowing in a conductor constitute an electric current; when ejected from a radioactive substance, they are beta particles.ƒ

The number of electrons revolving around the nucleus of an atom is equal to its atomic number. An atom of oxygen, for instance, which has an atomic number of 8, has eight electrons in orbit around the nucleus in a manner similar to the planets revolving around the sun in our solar system.

Electrons greatly influence the behavior of an atom toward other atoms. The combination of various elements to form compounds is brought about by the losing or gaining of electrons; the process is sometimes called “sharing” of electrons. For example, the combination of the elements sodium and chlorine produce the compound sodium chloride (table salt). This is accomplished by the transfer of one electron from the outer electron shell of the sodium atom to the outer electron shell of the chlorine atom. This combining of elements by the loss or gain of electrons is called electrovalence.

e·lec·tron (β-),

(ē-lek'tron),
One of the negatively charged subatomic particles that orbit the positive nucleus, in one of several energy levels called shells; in mass they are estimated to be 1/1836.15 of a proton; when emitted from inside the nucleus of a radioactive substance, electrons are called β particles. A nucleus and its electrons constitute an atom.
See also: shell.
[electro- + -on]

electron

/elec·tron/ (e-lek´tron) an elementary particle with the unit quantum of (negative) charge, constituting the negatively charged particles arranged in orbits around the nucleus of an atom and determining all of the atom's physical and chemical properties except mass and radioactivity.electron´ic

electron

[ilek′tron]
Etymology: Gk, elektron, amber
1 a negatively charged elementary particle that has a specific charge, mass, and spin. The number of electrons associated with the nucleus of an atom is equal to the atomic number of the substance.
2 a negative beta particle emitted from a radioactive substance. See also atom, element, ion, neutron, proton.

e·lec·tron

(β-) (ĕ-lek'tron)
One of the negatively charged subatomic particles that are distributed about the positive nucleus and with it constitute the atom; in mass they are estimated to be 1/1836.15 of a proton; when emitted from inside the nucleus of a radioactive substance, electrons are called beta particles.
[electro- + -on]

Electron

One of the small particles that make up an atom. An electron has the same mass and amount of charge as a positron, but the electron has a negative charge.

electron (i·lekˑ·trn),

n the negatively charged particle that orbits around the nucleus of an atom.

e·lec·tron

(ĕ-lek'tron)
Negatively charged subatomic particles that orbit the positive nucleus, in one of several energy levels called shells. A nucleus and its electrons constitute an atom.
[electro- + -on]

electron (e) (ēlek´tron),

n a negatively charged elementary particle constituent in every neutral atom, with a mass of 0.000549. (Particles with an equal but opposite charge are called
positrons.)
electron beam,
n See electron stream.
electron stream,
n (electron beam, cathode ray, cathode stream), a stream of electrons emitted from the negative electrode (cathode) in a roentgen-ray tube; their bombardment of the anode gives rise to the roentgen rays.

electron

any of the negatively charged particles arranged in orbits around the nucleus of an atom and determining all of the atom's physical and chemical properties except mass and radioactivity. Electrons flowing in a conductor constitute an electric current; when ejected from a radioactive substance, they constitute the beta particles.

electron acceptor
see oxidant.
electron beam
the stream of electrons that flows from the anode to the cathode in the x-ray tube and then interacts with the tungsten target to produce x-rays.
electron carrier
a molecule associated with membrane-bound proteins that accepts and transfers electrons.
electron donor
electron micrographs
photographic images of electron microscopic fields.
electron microscope
see electron microscope.
electron microscopy
technology of using an electron microscope.
References in periodicals archive ?
F, G, J) of isolated mitochondria (A), pt-division machineries (B), complexes of mt- and pt-division machineries (D, E, F), mt-division machinery (G), mitochondria and ZED (J), contraction model of pt-division machineries (C), an electron micrograph of the complex of isolated mt- and pt- division machineries (H), and SDS-PAGE (I).
Scanning electron micrographs of another component manufactured with the leather-like texture is shown in Fig.
This reflects the ciliary patterns scan in scanning electron micrographs in which the dorsal area of the pygidium in the hatched larva is devoid of cilia (4).
There are a total of 44 electron micrographs in the book.
Photographs of scanning electron micrographs and agar plates utilizing various mediums are furnished to illustrate the growth of different organisms.
This is demonstrated in the accompanying electron micrographs of PP/EPDM blends before and after annealing.
The reproduction of the original articles is excellent, including many transmission electron micrographs and the striking freeze-fracture pictures of the cell membrane.
Both the electron micrographs and the light micrographs are very clear and well labeled.
The deep-etched scanning electron micrographs shown on p.
The book covers all orthopteroid insects, which include grasshoppers, crickets, katydids, cockroaches, mantids and stick insects, it caters for general and experienced readers and provides identification keys, taxonomic details, illustrations of anatomical characteristics and photographs and electron micrographs of the insects, taken by Rentz in the field and laboratory.
It allows passage of moisture and air for comfort, but electron micrographs show clearly that mites and their fecal particles are too large to pass through the spaces between the fibers.
Electron micrographs of the samples were taken with a JEOL JSM 35 CF (Tokyo, Japan) scanning electron microscope.

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