electron carrier


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electron carrier

n.
Any of various molecules, such as cytochromes and quinonoid compounds, that accept one or two electrons from one molecule and donate them to another in the process of electron transport, resulting in the release of energy that is used to produce ATP.

electron carrier

A compound, such as a coenzyme, capable of taking up electrons from a molecule and transferring them to another, thereby undergoing reversible reduction and oxidation.

electron

any of the negatively charged particles arranged in orbits around the nucleus of an atom and determining all of the atom's physical and chemical properties except mass and radioactivity. Electrons flowing in a conductor constitute an electric current; when ejected from a radioactive substance, they constitute the beta particles.

electron acceptor
see oxidant.
electron beam
the stream of electrons that flows from the anode to the cathode in the x-ray tube and then interacts with the tungsten target to produce x-rays.
electron carrier
a molecule associated with membrane-bound proteins that accepts and transfers electrons.
electron donor
electron micrographs
photographic images of electron microscopic fields.
electron microscope
see electron microscope.
electron microscopy
technology of using an electron microscope.
References in periodicals archive ?
2] are regarded as fundamental reactions of hydrogenases, because these reactions can be observed in the absence of any electron carrier.
Quinone-reducing hydrogenase (7,55) and methanophenazine hydrogenase (7,56,57) have membrane-bound dihemic cytochrome b as the third subunit to interact with the electron carrier, menaquinone and methanophenazine, respectively.
Early achievements by studies on hydrogenases were the establishment of their electron carrier specificity and demonstration of heterolytic cleavage of [H.
Recently a Japanese laboratory reported the existence of superconducting oxides that contain electron carriers.
Replacing the lanthanum with an electron-packed rare-earth element such as neodyn-dum (Nd), he theorized, should create conditions ideal for electron carriers.

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