electron


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

electron

 [e-lek´tron]
any of the negatively charged particles arranged in orbitals around the nucleus of an atom and determining all of the atom's physical and chemical properties except mass and radioactivity. Electrons flowing in a conductor constitute an electric current; when ejected from a radioactive substance, they are beta particles.ƒ

The number of electrons revolving around the nucleus of an atom is equal to its atomic number. An atom of oxygen, for instance, which has an atomic number of 8, has eight electrons in orbit around the nucleus in a manner similar to the planets revolving around the sun in our solar system.

Electrons greatly influence the behavior of an atom toward other atoms. The combination of various elements to form compounds is brought about by the losing or gaining of electrons; the process is sometimes called “sharing” of electrons. For example, the combination of the elements sodium and chlorine produce the compound sodium chloride (table salt). This is accomplished by the transfer of one electron from the outer electron shell of the sodium atom to the outer electron shell of the chlorine atom. This combining of elements by the loss or gain of electrons is called electrovalence.

e·lec·tron (β-),

(ē-lek'tron),
One of the negatively charged subatomic particles that orbit the positive nucleus, in one of several energy levels called shells; in mass they are estimated to be 1/1836.15 of a proton; when emitted from inside the nucleus of a radioactive substance, electrons are called β particles. A nucleus and its electrons constitute an atom.
See also: shell.
[electro- + -on]

electron

/elec·tron/ (e-lek´tron) an elementary particle with the unit quantum of (negative) charge, constituting the negatively charged particles arranged in orbits around the nucleus of an atom and determining all of the atom's physical and chemical properties except mass and radioactivity.electron´ic

electron

[ilek′tron]
Etymology: Gk, elektron, amber
1 a negatively charged elementary particle that has a specific charge, mass, and spin. The number of electrons associated with the nucleus of an atom is equal to the atomic number of the substance.
2 a negative beta particle emitted from a radioactive substance. See also atom, element, ion, neutron, proton.

e·lec·tron

(β-) (ĕ-lek'tron)
One of the negatively charged subatomic particles that are distributed about the positive nucleus and with it constitute the atom; in mass they are estimated to be 1/1836.15 of a proton; when emitted from inside the nucleus of a radioactive substance, electrons are called beta particles.
[electro- + -on]

Electron

One of the small particles that make up an atom. An electron has the same mass and amount of charge as a positron, but the electron has a negative charge.

electron (i·lekˑ·trn),

n the negatively charged particle that orbits around the nucleus of an atom.

e·lec·tron

(ĕ-lek'tron)
Negatively charged subatomic particles that orbit the positive nucleus, in one of several energy levels called shells. A nucleus and its electrons constitute an atom.
[electro- + -on]

electron (e) (ēlek´tron),

n a negatively charged elementary particle constituent in every neutral atom, with a mass of 0.000549. (Particles with an equal but opposite charge are called
positrons.)
electron beam,
n See electron stream.
electron stream,
n (electron beam, cathode ray, cathode stream), a stream of electrons emitted from the negative electrode (cathode) in a roentgen-ray tube; their bombardment of the anode gives rise to the roentgen rays.

electron

any of the negatively charged particles arranged in orbits around the nucleus of an atom and determining all of the atom's physical and chemical properties except mass and radioactivity. Electrons flowing in a conductor constitute an electric current; when ejected from a radioactive substance, they constitute the beta particles.

electron acceptor
see oxidant.
electron beam
the stream of electrons that flows from the anode to the cathode in the x-ray tube and then interacts with the tungsten target to produce x-rays.
electron carrier
a molecule associated with membrane-bound proteins that accepts and transfers electrons.
electron donor
electron micrographs
photographic images of electron microscopic fields.
electron microscope
see electron microscope.
electron microscopy
technology of using an electron microscope.
References in periodicals archive ?
Consider what happens when photons of sunlight hit a solar cell: They strike electrons in semiconductor material and send them on their way as an electric current.
In the electricity-generating MFCs, the protons and electrons combine at the cathode with oxygen to form water.
238(11) [13] from a measurement of electrons and protons in coincidence, which is the first determination to date.
High magnification scanning electron microscopy images of the SARS-CoV form and structure (Figure 3C, arrows) appeared to correlate well with those images that used negative staining and TEM (Figure 3C, inset).
The book consists of two parts: Part I focuses on the motion of charged particles in static fields, the theory of electron lenses, and the problems of formation and transport of intense electron beams are considered; Part II covers the principles and theory of the interaction of electron beams with electromagnetic waves in quasi-stationary systems (diodes, klystrons), systems with continuous interactions (traveling wave tubes and backward wave oscillators), crossed-field systems (traveling wave and backward wave tubes of M-type, magnetrons, crossed-field amplifiers.
In order to obtain an exact answer concerning the background conditions, the test experiment with the collimated neutron beam and the electron and proton detectors is required.
Although swab samples placed into viral transport media may allow nucleic acid amplification techniques or culture of non-fastidious agents to be carried out, such specimens are not very conducive to successful rapid electron microscopy diagnosis of lesion exudates because of dilution effects and interfering components.
In the cathode chamber, the electrons and protons combine with oxygen to form water.
A decay event is identified by a delayed coincidence between a fast electron (TOF[approximately equal to]10 ns) and a slow proton (TOF on the order of tens of microseconds).
Here X(E) is the experimental asymmetry for some slice of electron energy E:
Working closely with Norse Pipeline to understand its business objectives, Mobile Electron recommended a wireless solution comprising AirLink's Raven rugged wireless modems, featuring AirLink Embedded Operating System (ALEOS) intelligent software, deployed on Verizon Wireless' CDMA networks.
The electron neutrino correlation, a, expresses the dependence of decay rate on the angle between the neutrino and electron, cos(Vev) = cos(Ve)cos(Vv) + sin(Ve)sin(Vv)cos([phi]e - [phi]v).