electrometer

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e·lec·trom·e·ter

(ĕ-lek-tromĕ-tĕr)
A device for measuring the electromotive force (voltage) of a source of electricity.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

e·lec·trom·e·ter

(ĕ-lek-tromĕ-tĕr)
A device for measuring the electromotive force (voltage) of a source of electricity.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Offering better than 200-T[OMEGA] input resistance, the electrometer versions can source up to [+ or -] 1,000 V (with 700-[micro]V minimum resolution) and measure up to 10 P[OMEGA].
The charge measurement range of most electrometers can be extended through the use of the external feedback mode, which allows use of an external device as the electrometer's feedback element.
The NIST chamber was connected to the PTW electrometer. Prior to performing the measurements, a voltage was applied to the chamber overnight to allow sufficient time for the chamber to stabilize.
In 1784, French physicist Charles-Augustin de Coulomb developed the torsion-balance electrometer, a sensitive device that measures electric forces.
The coulomb's function of an electrometer can be used with a step voltage source to measure capacitance levels ranging from <10pF to hundreds of nanofarads.
Applications: Memory and special applications in metrology, including highly sensitive electrometers, and primary thermometers.
As a result, sensitive feedback ammeters such as electrometers and picoammeters have voltage burdens typically limited to 200[micro]V.
IGCs provide power to BAG-tube electrodes and filaments and calculate pressures from ion currents measured by sensitive electrometers. Analog or digital pressure readings are then displayed on the front panel of the instrument.
Products include data acquisition boards, DMMs, electrometers, precision sources, voltmeters, ohm meters, source measure units, power supplies, and switching systems.