electrocardiographic

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electrocardiographic

emanating from or pertaining to electrocardiography.

electrocardiographic monitoring
maintenance of a more or less continuous surveillance of a patient's cardiac status by means of electrocardiography.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to the history and physical, evaluation may include an electrocardiogram, echocardiogram and ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring.
A recent study that found the use of continuous ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring increased the detection and diagnosis of silent atrial fibrillation in asymptomatic patients with known risk factors, US-based digital health care solutions company iRhythm Technologies, Inc.
Following the development of ambulatory Holter electrocardiographic recording and transtelephonic electrocardiographic monitoring (TTM) cardiac remote monitoring systems were researched widely and then applied in clinical practice.
American Heart Association scientific statement: Practice standards for electrocardiographic monitoring in hospital settings: An American Heart Association scientific statement from the councils on Cardiovascular Nursing, Clinical Cardiology, and Cardiovascular Disease in the Young: Endorsed by the International Society of Computerized Electrocardiology and the American Association of Critical Care Nurses.
Instrumentation and practice standards for electrocardiographic monitoring in special care units.
This study was designed to investigate BP load variations and the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias, as assessed by simultaneous ambulatory BP and electrocardiographic monitoring, in a group of elderly hypertensive subjects.
Patients with severe malaria in the United States should be treated in intensive-care facilities where central hemodynamic and electrocardiographic monitoring is available.
The initial ECG was abnormal in about half the patients but led to a diagnosis in only 30; electrocardiographic monitoring was useful in 54 patients and electrophysiologic studies in seven.
Thirteen chapters are: philosophy and treatment in US critical care units; vital measurements and shock syndromes in critically ill adults; monitoring for respiratory dysfunction; electrocardiographic monitoring for cardiovascular dysfunction; hemodynamic monitoring in critical care; monitoring for neurological dysfunction; monitoring for renal dysfunction; monitoring for blood glucose dysfunction in the intensive care unit; traumatic injuries; oncologic emergencies in critical care; end-of-life concerns; monitoring for overdoses.
Twenty-four-hour ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring of her cardiac rhythm using a Holter recorder did not reveal any arrhythmias, even though she reported several attacks of palpitations during the recording.