electrical impedance tomography


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electrical impedance tomography

a still largely experimental investigatory and imaging modality.
See also: tomography.

electrical impedance tomography

Cross-sectional body imaging that reconstructs pictures of internal organs based on measurements of their electrical activity as detected by electrodes placed on the surface of the body.
See also: tomography
References in periodicals archive ?
Sola et al., "Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) for quantification of pulmonary edema in acute lung injury," Critical Care, vol.
Soleimani, "Numerical modelling errors in electrical impedance tomography," Physiol.
Electrical impedance tomography: A method for monitoring regional lung aeration and tidal volume distribution?
[10] York T Electrical tomography for industrial applications chapter 10 in Electrical Impedance Tomography: Methods History and Applications Holder D ed.
Tompkins, "Comparing reconstruction algorithms for electrical impedance tomography," IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, vol.
Jampana, A Multifrequency Constant Current Source Suitable for Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT), In Proceedings of International Conference on Systems in Medicine and Biology, December (2010), pp.
Moran, "Dogleg trust-region application in electrical impedance tomography," Physiological Measurement, Vol.
This digital PSD system has been incorporated ineach of the 35 parallel voltage-measurement channels of the bio-medical EIT instrument fEITER (functional Electrical Impedance Tomography of Evoked Responses) built at the University of Manchester [11].
An EIT method called symmetrical electrical impedance tomography (SEIT) was then proposed to image the asymmetry of the bilateral impedance of human heads to detect unilateral cerebral lesions.
Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) can produce cross-sectional images of conductivity and permittivity distributions inside a tissue using pairs of injection currents and induced boundary voltages [12].
Eight methods are covered: mammography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine, ultrasound, magnetic resonance microscopy, positron emission tomography, electrical impedance tomography. Further chapters deal with interpretation and applications of magnetic resonance imaging in atherosclerosis, osteoarthritis, myocardial deformations, and drug development.
The clinical need for bedside dynamic imaging that offers both regional detail and temporal resolution has generated considerable enthusiasm for electrical impedance tomography (EIT)--a technology adapted from non-medical fields that takes advantage of the differences in electrical conductivity of gas and fluid.

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