elective

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elective

[ilek′tiv]
Etymology: L, eligere, to choose
pertaining to a procedure that is performed by choice and is not essential, such as elective surgery.

elective

Referring to a procedure which is planned in advance, non-emergent and, in the UK, may be based on a waiting list.

elective

adjective Referring to that which is planned or undertaken by choice and without urgency, as in elective surgery, see there. noun Graduate education noun A short–±6 wk period of clinical contact undertaken by a 4th-yr medical student, during which he/she learns about a field related to a planned specialty. See Match, Rotation.

elective

A term usually used of treatment. Undertaken to achieve advantage for the patient, but not essential to life or health. Most cosmetic surgical operations can be considered elective.

elective

non-urgent; at an elected time, e.g. of surgery.
References in periodicals archive ?
Electivity values for both anurans were higher for colonial arthropods, considered aloctonous prey, such as Isoptera and Formicidae.
Even though the ground under and around juniper trees was often covered by berries, the electivity value (0.
To illustrate the significant relationships demonstrated by the analysis described above, we constructed two new variables: a measure of electivity in the focal population and a measure of relative host use in the surroundings of the focal population.
However, the electivity index is a measure of relative preference and the average percent grazed of Desmodium did not differ between burned and unburned areas.
The electivity values provide a species-specific measure of prey selection by allowing a comparison of salmon gut contents to available prey.
Hunting densities of the five species were regressed against Ivlev electivity indices for natural woods ([E.
Ivlev's electivity coefficient Ivlev (1961) was selected because of the variable nature of the bivalve communities in the intertidal.
However, that electivity also provided planning opportunities that Congress came to consider abusive.
where E is the index of electivity, r is the relative abundance of prey category i in the gut, and p; is the relative abundance of prey category i in the environment (Wootton, 1998).
The relative preference for the six size classes of stems within each species was determined by Ivlev's Electivity Index (Krebs 1999).
But taking away the explicit electivity would not solve the problem.