elective delivery


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elective delivery

Aiding the birth of a newborn before the onset of uterine contractions or the spontaneous rupture of membranes.
See also: delivery
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In mild cases of OC, studies have not shown an increase in stillbirth, but practice of elective delivery at 37 to 38 weeks of gestation in such cases, increase the risk of complication of pregnancy outcome and its cost.
According to the researchers, "these early deliveries are associated with a preventable increase in neonatal morbidity and admissions to the neonatal [intensive care unit], which carry a high economic cost." They believe their "findings support recommendations to delay elective delivery until 39 weeks of gestation and should be helpful in counseling."
Professor James Walker, spokesman for the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, said: "Normally we would not recommend any elective delivery over a week before the due date unless there is a pressing medical reason."
These women were asked to forgo elective delivery before 40 weeks, 5 days, but to be delivered by 42 weeks, 2 days.
Participants were unclear how to interpret or use hospital quality measures that they viewed as the doctor's responsibility, which included early elective delivery rates, NTSV C-section, and episiotomy.
The five targeted interventions include antibiotics for viral upper respiratory infections, overtransfusion of red blood cells, tympanostomy tubes for middle ear effusion of brief duration, early-term non-medically indicated elective delivery, and elective percutaneous coronary intervention.
Despite widespread efforts to eradicate elective delivery before 39 weeks of gestation, patients continue to ask for it.
These findings support recommendations to delay elective delivery until 39 weeks gestation and should be helpful in counseling women on the necessity of waiting to deliver," New England Journal of Medicine quoted Tita, as saying.
neonatal mortality coincident with improved adherence to the rule to wait until 39 weeks' gestation before proceeding with an elective delivery, the increased number of stillbirths was "unacceptable," said Dr.