elastin


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elastin

 [e-las´tin]
a yellow scleroprotein, the essential constituent of elastic connective tissue; it is brittle when dry, but flexible and elastic when moist.

e·las·tin

(ē-las'tin), [MIM*130160]
A yellow elastic fibrous mucoprotein that is the major connective tissue protein of elastic structures (for example, large blood vessels, tendons, ligaments); elastins precursor is proelastin.
Synonym(s): elasticin

elastin

/elas·tin/ (e-las´tin) a yellow scleroprotein, the essential constituent of elastic connective tissue; it is brittle when dry, but when moist is flexible and elastic.

elastin

(ĭ-lăs′tĭn)
n.
A protein similar to collagen that is the principal structural component of elastic fibers.

elastin

[ilas′tin]
Etymology: Gk, elaunein, to drive
a protein that forms the principal substance of yellow elastic tissue fibers.

elastin

A fibrous protein which is similar to collagen (in that one-third of the amino acids are glycine) with abundant proline, valine, and arginine, and which is formed by cross-linking small globular subunits to lysine residues. Elastin’s elasticity is ideally suited for its prominent role in arterial walls, vocal cords, alveolar septa, and ligaments, and has an amorphous wavy appearance by light microscopy. Defects in the cross-linking in elastin’s unique beta spiral, as well as increases or decreases in elastin, are implicated in coronary heart disease, emphysema, type-V Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Menke’s kinky hair disease, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, and X-linked cutis laxa.

e·las·tin

(ĕ-las'tin)
A yellow elastic fibrous mucoprotein that is the major connective tissue protein of elastic structures (large blood vessels, tendons, and ligaments).
Synonym(s): elasticin.

elastin

the major protein found in ELASTIC FIBRES, responsible for the extensible and resilient nature of tissues, such as the skin, lung and larger blood vessels.

connective tissues

tissues with a variety of functions including support, protection and partitioning around and within body structures. Different types vary from delicate networks to tough bands and sheets. All have cells within some type of matrix, which they form, and which may be mainly fibrous, cartilaginous, bony or fluid. Bundles of white collagen fibres (containing the protein collagen), strong and only slightly extensible, provide a supporting network in organs and tissues everywhere in the body (except the central nervous system) and in the sheaths and membranes that surround or separate them, form the basis of tendons and ligaments and are components of cartilage and bone. Extensible elastic fibres (containing the protein elastin) form networks, e.g. in the walls of arteries and in the lungs, and are a component of flexible cartilage (such as in the nose and ears); reticular fibres form delicate networks, e.g. in the skin deep to the epidermis, and in the walls of small blood vessels. The cells associated with all these fibres are known as fibroblasts or, when inactive, as fibrocytes . adipose tissue is a connective tissue with a fibrous stroma, widely distributed internally as well as subcutaneously; its cells, adipocytes, are closely related to fibrocytes; likewise the osteocytes in bone and chondrocytes in cartilage. Also classified as connective tissue are the various cells in the tissue interstices (e.g. macrophages) and in the blood.

elastin

a yellow scleroprotein, the essential constituent of elastic connective tissue; it is brittle when dry, but flexible and elastic when moist.
References in periodicals archive ?
Let's take a look at how a unique peptide regenerates collagen and elastin to deliver remarkable skin tightening effects.
4 joules : 4 min) Arbitary score card (visual analog score): - Nil, [+ or -] traces, + mild, ++ moderate, +++ marked, ++++ extensive Table 2: Mean values of collagen, elastin, reticulin and mucopolysaccharide at different time intervals Parameter Interval (days) Group I Group II Collagen 10 + + to ++ 20 + + ++ to +++ 30 ++ to +++ ++++ Elastin 10 + + 20 + to ++ ++ to +++ 30 ++ +++ Reticulin 10 ++ +++ 20 ++ to + +++ to ++ 30 + ++ to + Mucopoly- 10 ++ ++ to +++ saccharide 20 + + 30 - [+ or -] Group I: Dressing of wounds+ parenteral antibiotic + parenteral analgesic (control) Group II : Dressing of wounds + Parenteral antibiotic + Parenteral analgesic+ Low level laser therapy (10 Hz /30 Hz :2.
Two antigens will be used, purified elastin that will be obtained as described in the calcification model and the degraded elastin obtained from the calcification model at multiple concentrations.
This is based on the fact that (1) air spaces are reduced, giving rise to collapsed lung with pseudopapillary appearance of the lepidic growth, and (2) elastin stains highlight preexisting alveolar structure.
Several studies have also revealed that the gingival macromolecular component is affected by periodontal disease, with pronounced alterations of collagen and elastin [Ejeil et al.
Cavitation within pulmonary infiltrates represents necrosis of lung tissue and is associated with the finding of elastin fibres in sputum (4).
The hot alkali extraction process typically resulted in a pure elastin fibrous matrix that is mechanically fragile and fully hydrated.
To keep your skin moist and elastic, this middle layer contains a mesh of elastin fibers and a sulfur-containing protein called collagen.
Fibroblasts control levels of the proteins collagen and elastin which are found in skin, bones and other tissue.
Led by Engineering Professor Wilfred Chen, scientists at the University of California-Riverside have genetically modified bacteria by adding the muscle protein elastin to the original bacterial protein; when heated, the new form tends to clump.
First, the scientists genetically engineered bacteria to create a molecule containing both the bacterial protein and an artificial form of the muscle protein elastin.
Collagen and elastin fibres, which are in the deeper layers of skin and keep it stretchy, become damaged.