elastography

(redirected from elasticity imaging)

elastography

A non-invasive technique in which the elasticity of soft tissue is assessed—usually by ultrasonography—during application of mechanical compression or vibration. Because cancer is 5 to 28 times stiffer than normal surrounding soft tissue, strain images of tissues with cancer have been used to detect and classify tumours; the technique may be used in the future to improve diagnostic accuracy and provide surgical guidance.

elastography

(i-las″tog′ră-fē)
A procedure to diagnose malignant tissue by imaging with ultrasonography. Since healthy tissue is significantly less stiff than malignant tissue, the imaged tissue may be distorted to differing degrees, and thus it may be possible to distinguish a malignancy in the ultrasound image, e.g., in the diagnosis of breast cancers.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Evaluation of breast lesions using sonographic elasticity imaging: a multicenter trial.
Ahuja, "Shear wave elasticity imaging of cervical lymph nodes," Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, vol.
Jia et al., "Noninvasive Ultrasound Elasticity Imaging (UEI) of Crohn's Disease: Animal Model," Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, vol.
It compares pros and cons of various measurement techniques, encompassing conventional methods new indentation methods of measurement, such as nanoindentation, suction measurement, indirect methods, elasticity imaging, modeling of tissue nonlinearity and viscoelasticity, and finite element methods.
[4] introduced shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) for noninvasive diagnosis of changes in tissue mechanical properties.
Most of the reported elastography techniques focus currently on three fields: (l) Optimization methods in elasticity imaging; (2) Freehand palpation elasticity imaging; and (3) Real-time elasticity imaging.
Mathematical Methods in Elasticity Imaging. Princeton Series in Applied Mathematics, Princeton University Press, 2015.
Artann's technologies include bone ultrasonometry, colonoscopy force monitor, mechanical imaging, breast mechanical imaging, prostate mechanical imaging, vaginal tactile imager, shear wave elasticity imaging, temperature profile spectroscopy, droplet, body hydration monitor, and time reversal acoustics.
Thirteen contributed chapters begin with the fundamentals, addressing multiwave imaging to elasticity imaging, and speckle interferometry and nonlinear methods.
Overall, elasticity imaging increases the specificity of ultrasound by measuring the compressibility and mechanical properties of a lesion.
Applications include cardiovascular elasticity imaging, harmonic motion imaging in high intensity focused ultrasound (as used in breast cancer detection, and characterization of skeletal muscle elasticity using magnetic resonance elastography.