elastic membrane


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Related to elastic membrane: external elastic lamina, internal elastic lamina

e·las·tic mem·brane

a condensed membranous mass of elastic fibers, present in the coats of the arteries, and distinct from the looser elastic lamella (for example, those found in veins and the respiratory tract).

e·las·tic mem·brane

(ĕ-las'tik mem'brān)
A membrane formed of elastic connective tissue, present as fenestrated lamellae in the coats of the arteries and elsewhere.

elastic membrane

Any of several membranes formed of elastic connective tissue fibers.
See also: membrane
References in periodicals archive ?
Hydrodynamic interaction of elastic membranes in a stenosed microchanne, Applied Mathematical Modelling 54: 361-377.
When there is no incident sound wave, the elastic membrane will be tensioned to be a straight line; however, when there are incident waves along the -z direction, the impinging of sound beams on the membrane will lead to forced vibration and deformation of the membrane.
This solution was then used to suspend an elastic membrane across a circular frame.
New increase in superoxide production in neurons/glia and blood vessel cells was found on D30, accompanied with increased [H.sub.2][O.sub.2] production in the internal elastic membrane. Also, the blue autofluorescence of the internal elastic membrane was the most intensive in the whole development.
The aorta in foetal age 30-49 days displayed well-developed tunics, with very prominent elastic membranes, abundant smooth muscle cells and few layers of elastic fibers in the tunica intima.
In arteries, it is relatively thick and extends from the internal elastic membrane to the external elastic membrane.
Pipkin, "The relaxed energy density for isotropic elastic membranes," IMA Journal of Applied Mathematics, vol.
The relationship between pressure and maximum deflection for the case of an elastic membrane, shown in Figure 3, assuming a spherical deflection profile, can be derived using a force balance and is given by
Tuzcu pointed out that angiographic assessment of atherosclerotic lesions is based on an inherent assumption that the external elastic membrane area in the so-called reference segment is representative of the original vessel size at the lesion site.
The images provide a view once seen only at autopsy of the intima, the endothelium, the media, and the external elastic membrane where the adventitia begins.
Because the eardrum is a thin, elastic membrane that is stretched as tight as a drum, it vibrates when it is hit.