elastic bougie

e·las·tic bou·gie

a bougie made of rubber, latex, or other similarly flexible material.

elastic bougie

a flexible bougie that can be passed through angular or winding channels. See also bougie.

e·las·tic bou·gie

(ē-lastik bū-zhē)
Investigative instrument made of rubber, latex, or other similarly flexible material.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Several studies have shown that anaesthetists find this device easy to use with a high successful tracheal intubation rate, with or without the use of a gum elastic bougie (3,16,25,37-41).
When faced with a difficult airway the gum elastic bougie and the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) may be useful.
With a method similar to ours, some authors have used a gum elastic bougie in combination with rigid bronchoscopy to achieve control in adults.
May 30 /PRNewswire/ -- For over 30 years, Smiths Medical has manufactured the reusable tracheal tube introducer -- known as the gum elastic bougie -- considered to be the gold standard for difficult airways grades 2B, 2, and 4.
The guide has included a fiberoptic bronchoscope, nasogastric tube, balloon-tipped catheter, gum elastic bougie, and various types of suction catheters.
At our hospital use of a gum elastic bougie was the most commonly used piece of equipment to help anaesthetists manage a difficult intubation.
12) In several of these cases, an elastic bougie or a guidewire was passed through a bronchoscope.
To overcome the problem, various insertion aids have been described, such as a curved metal introducer tool or the use of a gum elastic bougie (GEB) (4).
Attempt intubation now with the aid of a gum elastic bougie to guide the tube C.
We read with great interest the recent letter of Abbas (1) regarding use of a gum elastic bougie (GEB) through Murphy's eye for difficult intubation.
stylet, gum elastic bougie or tube exchanger) is to be discouraged unless undertaken by an experienced practitioner in a stable, well-oxygenated and easily ventilated patient because it not only exposes the patient to further risk of hypoxic injury, but it may also contribute to deteriorating conditions by worsening tissue trauma, bleeding and airway oedema.
Mathes and colleagues evaluated two techniques alternating a paediatric gum elastic bougie and a nasogastric tube.