elapse


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elapse

(i-laps′) [L. elapsus, slipped by]
Of time, to pass.
References in periodicals archive ?
1374 exception, the legislation appears to reduce the amount of actual time that must elapse between certain S elections and January 1, 2009 (or 2010, as appropriate), for the Sec.
Ten years elapse since Katie and George first were attracted to each other, and the obstacles to their romance are reminiscent of Dickens.
As we welcome the New Year of 2003 Kind thoughts linger for you and me The season of good will must not elapse Now the Christmas spirit is in the past Don't rest you merry gentlemen, keep up the fight Press on regardless with all your might For someone, somewhere is sitting alone Huddled in a chair in a cold, damp home Yet we all know of the old folks plight Society has provided them with the bare essentials of life Some old folk often reduced to tears Not being able to manage in their twilight years It's now the time for friends to rally round While the bells of New Year ring in the New Year sound.
This practice involves charging interest from the date of purchase, although days elapse before they actually pay the merchant on your behalf.