ejection

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e·jec·tion

(ē-jek'shŭn),
1. The act of driving or throwing out by physical force from within.
2. That which is ejected. Synonym(s): ejecta
[L. ejectio, from ejicio, to cast out]

ejection

Cardiology See Ejection fraction, Ejection murmur Emergency medicine The throwing of a person from a vehicle.

e·jec·tion

(ē-jek'shŭn)
1. The act of driving or throwing out by physical force from within.
2. That which is ejected.
Synonym(s): ejecta.
[L. ejectio, from ejicio, to cast out]

e·jec·tion

(ē-jek'shŭn)
1. Driving or throwing out by physical force from within.
2. That which is ejected.
[L. ejectio, from ejicio, to cast out]
References in periodicals archive ?
Martin-Baker ejection seats have saved the lives of 7613 aviators since the first ejection in 1949.
Therefore, factors involving increased risk of ejection need to be analyzed for controlling significant risk of injury and mortality in ROCs with ejection.
After Wallace's ejection Friday, Celtics coach Doc Rivers said he couldn't say anything to Wallace that would change him.
The polymer throughput through the smallest diameter 20G needle was lower compared with the polymer solution ejection, and thus the strong electrical stress induced the intermittent electro-spinning, as shown in Fig.
These ejections carry billions of tons of plasma into space at thousands of miles per hour.
In the past, attempts to monitor coronal mass ejections focused on the sun from places along the line between the sun and Earth.
Coronal mass ejections strong enough to cause such damage happen only about twice a year, DeForest says.
Superheated gas and energy, called a coronal mass ejection, exploded from the Sun's surface travelling at five million miles per hour.
Prof Simnett said the scientists had to filter out light from about 200,000 stars to get a clear picture of the coronal mass ejections.
Coronal mass ejections erupt from the sun and travel at speeds as high as 2,000 km (1,240 mi) per second.