ejection fraction


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e·jec·tion frac·tion

the fraction of the blood contained in the ventricle at the end of diastole that is expelled during its contraction, that is, the stroke volume divided by end-diastolic volume, normally 0.55 (by electrocardiogram) or greater; with the onset of congestive heart failure, the ejection fraction decreases, sometimes to 0.10 or even less in severe cases.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ejection fraction

Left ventricular ejection fraction Cardiology The percentage of blood present in the left ventricle that is effectively pumped forward during systole to supply the peripheral circulation. See Congestive heart failure.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

e·jec·tion frac·tion

(EF) (ē-jek'shŭn frak'shŭn)
The fraction of blood contained in the ventricle at the end of diastole that is expelled during its contraction.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ejection fraction

The ratio of the stroke volume to the end diastolic volume in the ventricles of the heart. In the healthy heart the volume of blood in the left ventricle at the end of diastole is approximately 140 ml and the stroke volume is about 90 ml. The ejection fraction (stroke volume/end-diastolic volume) is between 50 and 70 per cent. The ejection fraction of the right ventricle is similar. Ejection fraction is not a good predictor of clinical disability. See also DIASTOLIC HEART FAILURE.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Ejection fraction

The fraction of all blood in the ventricle that is ejected at each heartbeat. One of the main advantages of the MUGA scan is its ability to measure ejection fraction, one of the most important measures of the heart's performance.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Likewise lower mortality rates have also been reported ranging from 19% to 25%,11,12 on comparison of survivors with non survivors after doing univariate analysis lower ejection fraction and the presence of cardiogenic shock were identified as predictors of operative mortality.
We presented the case of a patient who developed heart failure secondary to right ventricular pacing, with a severely decreased left ventricular ejection fraction (from 60 to 30% in four months) and severe mitral regurgitation.
Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) is an increasingly recognized form, and accounts for almost 50% of all admissions for decompensate heart failure.
Swedberg et al., "Effects of candesartan in patients with chronic heart failure and preserved left-ventricular ejection fraction: the CHARM-preserved trial," Lancet, vol.
Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), peak filling rate (PFR) and time to peak filling (TPF) values were obtained for comparison from the workstation database archives.
People with this type of heart failure have ejection fractions of 10 to 40 percent.
There are two forms of HF--systolic and diastolic--with the difference based on ejection fraction (the amount of blood the heart pumps out with each contraction).
Of the 448 patients who did receive proper screening for sudden cardiac arrest, 304 were ineligible for a defibrillator because their ejection fraction was too high.
A 60-year-old Caucasian male with a past history of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, hypertension, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism (PE), inferior vena cava filter placement, long-term anticoagulation, and obstructive sleep apnea was admitted following a traumatic sternal fracture sustained 6 months ago that resulted in a malunion.