eidetic


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Related to eidetic: Eidetic imagery

eidetic

 [i-det´ik]
denoting exact visualization of events or objects previously seen; a person having such an ability.

ei·det·ic

(ī-det'ik),
1. Relating to the power of visualization of and memory for objects previously seen that reaches its height in children aged 8-10.
2. A person possessing this power to a high degree.
[G. eidon, saw (aorist of verb)]

eidetic

adjective Referring to vividly precise and accurate recollection of objects, events, sounds or other imagery previously perceived.

ei·det·ic

(ī-det'ik)
1. Relating to the power of visualization of and memory for objects previously seen that peaks in children aged 8-10.
2. A person possessing this power to a high degree.
[G. eidon, saw (aorist of verb)]

eidetic

Strikingly vivid, detailed and accurate, allowing an extraordinarily lifelike imaging, or sometimes rehearing, of past experience.
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References in periodicals archive ?
There are two key concepts in addition to those described above (in the section on photon detection) which are central for an integrative understanding of the processes involved here: "eidetic imagery" and "subitizing." Eidetic imagery is defined by the dictionary as "of, relating to, or constituting visual imagery vividly experienced and readily reproducible with great accuracy and in great detail" (from the Greek root for "equivalent to"; http://www.dictionary.com).
The eidetic condition of this extension is the capacity
The new way of life generated a new consciousness and new artistic expressions, abstract symbols transcending the eidetic consciousness (5) of Paleolithic art whose greatest achievement lay in the unsurpassable realism of the cave paintings of Lascaux.
From a semiotic point of view, Fontanille (2004:197) [48], talking of movement and what he calls the "wrapping body", says that we are in front of an interaction of forces and substances, energy and matter, by which forms are produced, and his interaction between matter and energy originates the semiotic principle of the "eidetic conversion" (p.198) [49].
Bhart[hari's quest for a linguistic essence (Sabdabrahma) may be compared to the eidetic phenomenology of Edmund Husserl, which, in Halenstein's words is "concerned with the grasp of the essential features common to objects of the same category".
Dan Brown's The Lost Symbol continues the adventures of Robert Langdon, Harvard Professor of Symbology, a genius with an eidetic memory whose peculiar ability to interpret symbols lands him in hot water more often than his job description would lead you to suspect.
Ken Haines (Eidetic Images) was the holographer, Drury Baughan (Old Dominion Foils) was the embossing engineer.
Paul Ricoeur sought to widen things out and to go beyond a phenomenology of perception when early in his career he set himself the task of applying Husserlian eidetic analysis to the theme of the voluntary and the involuntary.
Lilly is a "rememberer"; her gift of eidetic memory is an essential component in dispensing medicine.
Unassuming and quiet by nature, Aashish has what is called an eidetic memory, also known as a photographic memory and total recall.