eicosanoid


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eicosanoid

(ī′kō-sə-noid′)
n.
Any of a group of substances that are derived from arachidonic acid, including leukotrienes, prostaglandins, and thromboxanes.

eicosanoid

A 20-carbon cyclic fatty acid derived from arachidonic acid that is synthesised from membrane phospholipids. Eicosanoids and other arachidonic acid metabolites (e.g., HETE, HPETE, leukotrienes, prostaglandins and thromboxanes) are site-specific, increase during shock and after injury, and have diverse functions, including bronchoconstriction, bronchodilation, vasodilation and vasoconstriction.

eicosanoid

Physiology A 20-carbon cyclic fatty acid which with its arachidonic acid metabolites–eg, HETE, HPETE, leukotrienes, PGs, and thromboxanes, are site-specific, ↑ during shock and after injury, have diverse functions–eg, bronchoconstriction, bronchodilation, vasodilation, vasoconstriction. See Arachidonic acid, Bad eicosanoid, Good eicosanoid, Zone-favorable diet.

eicosanoid

(ī-kō′să-noyd″)
Any of several autocrine or paracrine cytokines formed from the metabolism of arachidonic acid. They include prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes.
References in periodicals archive ?
The eicosanoid pathway is a signaling pattern that regulates inflammation when needed.
These eicosanoids have anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory effects [85].
After activating the column, the samples were passed and the eicosanoids were eluted from the column with 1 mL of water, 1 mL of ether, and 2 mL of methyl formate.
In terms of signal transduction, the phospholipase [A.sub.2] ([PLA.sub.2]) reaction, which hydrolyzes the sn-2 position of phospholipids to yield fatty acids and lysophospholipids, has been considered to be of particular importance, since arachidonic acid (AA, C20:4), one of the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) released from membrane phospholipids by [PLA.sub.2], is metabolized by cyclooxygenases (COXs) and lipoxygenases (LOXs) to lipid mediators including prostaglandins (PGs) and leukotrienes (LTs), which are often referred to as eicosanoids (Fig.
Fixed oil of Nigella sativa and derived thymoquinone inhibit eicosanoid generation in leukocytes and membrane lipid peroxidation.
Levine, "Altered eicosanoid levels in human colon cancer," The Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine, vol.
Hence, there is a growing interest in pharmacological modulation of eicosanoid production in attempt to control the evolution of T.
Competitive inhibition-EPA and DGLA compete for COX and LOX, thereby reducing the output of AA eicosanoids.
Aside from TLR signalling, C4 possibly exerts its antiinflammatory effects through modulation of the eicosanoid pathway.
For quantitative catecholamine and eicosanoid determination, the limit of detection or quantification was determined from the daily calibration curve, and absolute quantification was performed with stable isotope-labeled standards.
Therefore, supplementation with MPL is expected to be more effective in a relatively lower dose than fish oil or ethyl ester formulations regarding eicosanoid synthesis and its implications.
As a rule, diet fatty acids may affect the immune response by conditioning 1) plasmatic membrane fatty acid composition and its subsequent effects on the membrane's physical qualities (TOCHER, 1995), 2) cytokines and eicosanoid production, synthesized from the precursors eicosapentaenoic (20:5 n-3, EPA) and arachidonic (20:4 n-6, ARA) acids, which are the key cell messengers in the inflammation process (ROWLEY et al., 1995), and 3) transcription regulation of genes responsible for immune responses (MONTERO et al., 2008).