egoism


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Related to egoism: utilitarianism

egoism

 [e´go-izm]
1. any of several ethical doctrines describing relationships between morality, self-interest and behavior.
2. excessive preoccupation with oneself, self-interest with disregard for the needs of others.

egoism

/ego·ism/ (e´go-izm)
1. any of several ethical doctrines describing the relationship between morality, self-interest, and behavior.
2. excessive preoccupation with oneself, self-interest with disregard for the needs of others.

egoism

[ē′gō·iz′əm, eg′-]
1 selfishness, an overvaluation of the importance of the self, expressed as a willingness to gain an advantage at the expense of others. See also egotism.
2 the belief that individual self-interest is, or ought to be, the basic motive for all conscious behavior.

egoism

(ē′gō-ĭzm)
An inflated estimate of one's value or effectiveness.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The third section, 'Egoism and Virtue in Nietzsche and Rand', starts with Christine Swanton's article to explain the sense in which Rand defends her egoism or could allow for other-regarding behavior.
Therefore, we propose that the egoism perspective for ethical judgment captures the pre-conventional aspects of moral development (stages 1 and 2).
Aside from practical observations about the importance of egoism in volunteering, theoretical issues have been examined as well, including social role theory and psychological contract theory.
Moreover, the deontology dimension had the second highest means in two scenarios, and the egoism dimension had the lowest mean among all scenarios for both the US and Taiwan.
So the lure of egoism as a theory of human action is partly explained, I believe, by a certain wisdom, humility, or skepticism people have about their own or others' motives.
Part of the answer may be a failure to clarify the tricky relation between hedonism and egoism, or pleasure and reason.
Two years later, in Notes from Underground, Dostoevsky's treatment of cruelty and egoism is far more sophisticated.
By renouncing her happiness in favour of Casaubon's peace of mind and sense of safety, she escapes moral egoism and achieves self-fulfilment to a certain extent.
We watch him on the altar, wearing his egoism as a badge, and proclaiming God's word.
He posits that "forgiveness is communal" and that the core of reconciliation is: "[even when] a human has become so distorted and disfigured by egoism, rage, despair and fear, that person will be embraced by the Christian community" (p.
But (I think it's fair to say) they're exclusively the sins which, as well as being an offense against our neighbors, also offend against the community's own corporate egoism.