egoism


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to egoism: utilitarianism

egoism

 [e´go-izm]
1. any of several ethical doctrines describing relationships between morality, self-interest and behavior.
2. excessive preoccupation with oneself, self-interest with disregard for the needs of others.

egoism

(ē′gō-ĭzm)
An inflated estimate of one's value or effectiveness.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Although egoism is a weaker cause in motivation, it is, however, the most important cause in organizational commitment (Martin and Cullen, 2006).
"Egoism" is also used in ethical considerations of how human beings do or ought to live.
That scale consists of 12 items, and considers egoism and utilitarianism, which are not included in the 8-item scale.
vanity and egoism, her soul expands through a journey of suffering.
While rational egoism appeals to many ordinary folk, in sophisticated philosophical circles it has fallen out of favor as a general and complete account of the nature of reasons for action.
Egoism is becoming the only game in town, paving the way for anomie.
Hence egoism claims that an action might be ethical if it promotes an individual's interests (Cohen, et.
Among the entries are analog and binary utilitarianism, Jeremy Bentham, Christianity, cooperative utilitarianism, egoism, evolutionary theory, Michel Foucault, the harm principle, infinite utility, intergenerational justice, John Locke, motive utilitarianism, objective list theory, perfectionism, poor laws, rational choice theory, Adam Smith, Harriet Taylor, and value theory.
In the first paper of this issue Robert Nolt (2013) provides a careful analysis of analogies between the self-centered ness of personal egoism and the human-centeredness of anthropocentrism ('the egoism of the human species') and of parallel arguments for and against each.
This seems to entail egoism, in the sense the answer to the question 'why should I be moral?' appears to be answered by Socrates as saying 'because it makes me happy'.
Bernstein clearly explicates Rand's moral egoism: all people have the right to live for themselves, owing nothing to others except to respect their freedom by abjuring the "initiation of force" (17).
The national event buries individual egoism, and in turn gives birth to collective egoism reminding every Libyan of higher unity to which he/she belongs and the necessity of unifying his/her life with that of others.