ego-syntonic


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Related to ego-syntonic: ego-dystonic

ego-syntonic

 [e″go-sin-ton´ik]
denoting aspects of a person's thoughts, impulses, attitudes, and behavior that are felt to be acceptable and consistent with the rest of the personality. See also ego-dystonic.

e·go-syn·ton·ic

(ē'gō-sin-ton'ik),
Acceptable to the aims of the ego and the related psychological needs of the person (for example, a delusion); the opposite of ego-dystonic.
[ego + G. syn, together, + tonos, tension]

e·go-syn·ton·ic

(ē'gō-sin-ton'ik)
Acceptable to the aims of the ego and the related psychological needs of the individual (e.g., a delusion); the opposite of ego-dystonic.
[ego + G. syn, together, + tonos, tension]

Ego-syntonic

Consistent with one's sense of self, as opposed to ego-alien or dystonic (foreign to one's sense of self). Ego-syntonic traits typify patients with personality disorders.
Mentioned in: Personality Disorders
References in periodicals archive ?
We can dominate and control everything from which we disidentify ourselves." (15) According to the psychosynthesis model, it is easier to change thoughts we identify as foreign to "the self" (ego-dystonic) than thoughts we identify as being part of "the self" (ego-syntonic).
Patients whose suicidal thoughts are ego-syntonic identify with the thoughts as representing themselves and take ownership of these thoughts.
Examples of patients' ego-syntonic vs ego-dystonic suicidal thoughts are listed in Table 2.
Table 2 Examples of ego-syntonic vs ego-dystonic suicidal thoughts Ego-syntonic Ego-dystonic 'I want to be dead.
First, I conduct a comprehensive mental status examination that includes an in-depth exploration of the patient's suicidal thoughts to determine if they are ego-syntonic or ego-dystonic.
G, a 42-year-old mother of 2, suffers from bipolar II disorder with recurrent episodes of depression associated with ego-syntonic suicidal thoughts.
At times, she experiences these thoughts as ego-syntonic; at other times, they areego-dystonic.
(2) Hoarding often is ego-syntonic, and many patients do not believe their behaviors are problematic.
Because hoarding behavior frequently is ego-syntonic, patients may be brought in by family members or friends.