ego-dystonic

ego-dystonic

 [e″go-dis-ton´ik]
denoting aspects of a person's thoughts, impulses, attitudes, and behavior that are felt to be repugnant, distressing, unacceptable, or inconsistent with the rest of the personality. See also ego-syntonic.

e·go-dys·ton·ic

(ē'gō-dis-ton'ik),
Repugnant to or at variance with the aims of the ego and related psychological needs of the person (for example, an obsessive thought or compulsive behavior); the opposite of ego-syntonic.
Synonym(s): ego-alien
[ego + G. dys, bad, + tonos, tension]

ego-dystonic

/ego-dys·ton·ic/ (e´go-dis-ton´ik) denoting aspects of a person's thoughts, impulses, and behavior that are felt to be repugnant, distressing, unacceptable, or inconsistent with the self-conception.

ego-dystonic

[ē′gōdiston′ik]
describing elements of a person's behavior, thoughts, impulses, drives, and attitudes that are unacceptable to him or her and cause anxiety. Also called ego-alien, self-alien. Compare ego-syntonic.

e·go-dys·ton·ic

(ē'gō-dis-ton'ik)
Repugnant to or at variance with the aims of the ego and related psychological needs of the individual (e.g., an obsessive thought or compulsive behavior); the opposite of ego-syntonic
[ego + G. dys, bad, + tonos, tension]
References in periodicals archive ?
Individuals with both disorders frequently engage in excessive and unnecessary rituals even when it is ego-dystonic.
Psychosis should be treated if symptoms are ego-dystonic, she said.
It seems that instances of this viewer-character dissonance may take two possible forms: fundamental viewer-character dissonance and ego-dystonic viewer-character dissonance.
The labeling of homosexuality as ego-dystonic is thus political because societal norms are clearly implicit in its categorization as such.
Their findings revealed that although clients' intake concerns primarily focused on career exploration issues, clients also cited the need to address education-related issues and ego-dystonic emotions related to work.
I am not speaking of the ego-dystonic obsessionalism that one finds in obsessive-compulsive disorder, but the ego-syntonic obsessional traits of the bureaucrat.
Perhaps they find themselves requiring social assistance and/or accomodation and begin to perceive themselves to be in an ego-dystonic "minority" status.
In DSMIII-Revised, even ego-dystonic homosexuality was omitted.
John McNeill, a former Jesuit and an acknowledged homosexual, says that clergy are ego-dystonic, that is, with abnormal egos.
Bremmer and Hillin (1993) observe that it leads to an ego-dystonic identity, an internal conflict with one's sexuality.
3) His murderous wishes and fantasies are ego-dystonic, and panic could be a way of punishing himself for these thoughts.