ego


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ego

 [e´go]
in psychoanalytic theory, one of the three major parts of the personality, the others being the id and the superego. The word ego is Latin for “I,” that is, self or individual as distinguished from other persons. The ego is represented by certain mental mechanisms, such as perception and memory, and specific defense mechanisms that are used to adjust to the demands of primitive instinctual drives (the id) and the demands of the external world (superego). The ego may be considered the psychologic aspect of one's personality, the id comprising the physiologic aspects and the superego the social aspects. The ego controls and directs an individual's actions and seeks compromises between the id impulses, social and parental prohibitions, and the pressures of reality.ƒ

The word ego also is commonly used to express conceit or self-centeredness. This should not be confused with the psychiatric meaning described above.

e·go

(ē'gō),
In freudian psychoanalysis, ego along with id and superego, are the three components of the psychic apparatus. It spans the conscious, preconscious, and unconscious; is the structure within the personality functioning in an executive capacity to mediate conflict between the id and the outside world, as part of the progression from the dominance of the pleasure principle to that of the reality principle and subsequently mediates the conflict between the id and superego and itself. It perceives from moment to moment external reality, needs of the self (both physical and psychological), integrates the perceptions and uses of logical, abstract, secondary process thinking, and the mechanisms of defense available to it to formulate a response.
[L. I]

ego

(ē′gō)
n. pl. egos
1. The self, especially as distinct from the world and other selves.
2. In psychoanalysis, the division of the psyche that is conscious, most immediately controls thought and behavior, and is most in touch with external reality.
3.
a. An exaggerated sense of self-importance; conceit.
b. Appropriate pride in oneself; self-esteem.

ego

Psychiatry A major division in the Freudian model of the psychic apparatus, the others being the id and superego; ego is the sum of some mental mechanisms–eg, perception and memory, specific defense mechanisms, and mediates the demands of primitive instinctual drives–the id, of intemalized parental and social prohibitions–the superego, and reality–the compromises between these forces achieved by the ego tend to resolve intrapsychic conflict and serve an adaptive and executive function Vox populi Self-love, selfishness

e·go

(ē'gō)
psychoanalysis One of the three components of the psychic apparatus in the freudian structural framework, the other two being the id and superego. The ego occupies a position between the primal instincts (pleasure principle) and the demands of the outer world (reality principle), and therefore mediates between the person and external reality by performing the important functions of perceiving the needs of the self, both physical and psychologic, and the qualities and attitudes of the environment. It is also responsible for certain defensive functions to protect the person against the demands of the id and superego.
[L. I]

ego

1. The Latin word for ‘I’.
2. A person's consciousness of self.
3. In Freudian terms, a kind of rational internal person largely at the mercy of the ‘id’ (German for ‘it’) with its wicked and mainly sexual drives, but sometimes saved from disaster by the virtuous ‘super-ego’. Freud changed his definition of the ego several times. See also FREUDIAN THEORY.
References in periodicals archive ?
Only when you can start to perceive ego as your own construct can you begin to operate beyond it, rather than hanging on to it as if your life depends on it.
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It is reported by researchers that the process of ego integrity development is severely interrupted by the decline of physical health.
Interestingly, the content of Es 18 items appears to represent several noted functions of the ego including self-control, maintaining contact with reality, attention, judgement, affect regulation, and tolerance of oneself (Cabaniss, Cherry, Douglas, & Schwartz, 2011).
Killing your ego is one of the best things you can do for yourself this 2018.
So what can you do about your ego? There is no single answer but there are a few simple steps that can be taken.
From the perspective of ego depletion, besides intuition, resources that individuals use in making decisions are the capabilities to think prudently and carefully (Pocheptsova, Amir, Dhar, & Baumeister, 2009).
To identify ego modules and pathways in OS, we integrated the EgoNet algorithm and pathway-related analysis, as shown in Figure 1.
In comics, Ego is known as Ego the Living Planet and is portrayed as an actual planet but in the upcoming James Gunn-directed sequel, the character will be less planet-like and more human. 
In this excerpt from Ego Is the Enemy, Ryan Holiday, best-selling author of The Obstacle Is the Way, tackles the non-Freudian or casual definition of ego and its dangers: an unhealthy belief in our own importance.