egg


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egg

 [eg]
1. ovum.
2. oocyte.
3. a female reproductive cell at any stage before fertilization; after fertilization and fusion of the pronuclei it is called a zygote.

egg

(eg),
The female sexual cell, or gamete; after fertilization and fusion of the pronuclei it is a zygote; in humans the term egg is not used. In reptiles and birds, the egg is provided with a protective shell, membranes, albumin, and yolk for the nourishment of the embryo.
See also: oocyte, ovum.
[A.S. aeg]

egg

(ĕg)
n.
a. A female gamete; an ovum. Also called egg cell.
b. The round or oval female reproductive body of various animals, including birds, reptiles, amphibians, fishes, and insects, consisting usually of an embryo surrounded by nutrient material and a protective covering.
c. The oval, thin-shelled reproductive body of a bird, especially that of a hen, used as food.

egg′less adj.
egg′y adj.

egg

A popular term for a genetically haploid female sex cell.

egg

Parasitology A fertilized gamete which may give rise to an adult. See Chicken footprint egg Reproduction medicine A female reproductive cell, also called an oocyte or ovum.

egg

(eg)
The female sexual cell or gamete. (This term is not used in relation to humans.)
See also: oocyte
[A.S. aeg]

egg

The OVUM or female reproductive cell (GAMETE). The egg contains half the chromosomes required by the new individual, and the other half are supplied by the sperm at the moment of fertilization. The egg is a very large cell, about one tenth of a millimetre in diameter, and much larger than a sperm. This is because it contains nutritive material (yolk) to supply the embryo in its earliest stages before it can establish a supply from the mother via the placenta. If more than one egg is produced and fertilized, a multiple pregnancy results, but the offspring are not identical since half the chromosomes in each come from different sperms, with different genetic material. If a fertilized ovum divides, and each of the two halves forms a new individual, these will be identical twins, with identical chromosomes.

egg

  1. see OVUM.
  2. a structure produced by insects, birds and reptiles whose function is to enable embryonic development outside the female on land without the use of water as a growth medium. The vertebrate egg consists of an outer shell (hard in birds, leathery in reptiles), four types of embryonic membranes, a food supply in the yolk sac and surrounding albumen (‘egg white’) and the embryo which develops from an OVUM fertilized before the shell is deposited. Domestic birds can produce unfertilized eggs in which the embryo does not develop.

Patient discussion about egg

Q. Is there any difference between brown eggs and white eggs? My fitness instructor suggested me to have brown eggs instead of white eggs so is there any difference between brown eggs and white eggs?

A. I have to agree with you. Never heard of any difference between the two and it doesnt sound reasonable that one is better to your health than the other...

Q. why the renal doctor told my husband that he needs to eat a dozen of egg a week for protein,how it will help? it won`t afect his cholesterol,also i would like to know what role the protein plays on his treatment and what other foot its rich in protein that he can can take,without causing problems to his health.

A. if i understand correctly, your husband is diabetic. like my grandfather he probably developed a "Diabetic nephropathy" which is a long name to: kidney being destroyed because of blood vessels clotted by diabetes. because of that destruction the kidneys allow protein to go out in the urine. this is a dangerous situation,a protein in the name of "albomin" helps our blood to hold fluids in blood vessels. without it fluid will leave the blood and go to our organs. not a good situation. so he needs a lot of proteins.
here is a list of a 100 protein rich foods:
http://smarterfitter.com/blog/2007/10/28/100-most-protein-rich-vegetarian-foods/

Q. How can I catch Salmonella? Yesterday I ate a mousse which was made from raw eggs. Could I have caught Salmonella?

A. Salmonella infections usually resolve in 5-7 days and often do not require treatment unless the patient becomes severely dehydrated or the infection spreads from the intestines. Persons with severe diarrhea may require rehydration, often with intravenous fluids (IV). Antibiotics are not usually necessary unless the infection spreads from the intestines.

More discussions about egg
References in classic literature ?
"Look at your eggs," said Rikki-tikki, "in the melon bed near the wall.
Speaking to ANI, Dr Manish Kumar said, "People in our country mostly eat boil eggs and egg omelette.
[ClickPress, Thu May 16 2019] The increasing demand for processed eggs in the food industry provides immense opportunity for turning the eggs into valuable food ingredients for sellers of egg based products.
Taiwan has had many egg scares in the past, including expired eggs mixing with fresh eggs, and fipronil contaminated eggs.
Ancient cultures of the Egyptians, Persians and Phoenicians believed that the world originated from a huge egg. While the specifics may differ, for many communities around world an egg symbolises fertility and a new beginning.
B&M | AERO EASTER EGG (181G) Medium-size hollow milk chocolate egg with a selection of Aero favourites.
In addition, empty egg cartons make ideal drying racks, so do not discard them.
at the Jade Ballroom with Easter bento box snacks, party giveaways, and egg hunting games with prizes.
As well as asking them to publicly support the message that bigger isn't always better, BFREPA chairman James Baxter wants them to remove all references to egg size in recipes wherever possible.
Generally speaking, the only differences between a day-old egg and one that's been chilling for about eight months are the thickness of the whites and the plumpness of the yolks.
Quail eggs are more nutritious and healthier than chicken eggs.
Egg quality is a multifactorial character and influenced by genotype or breed, age and health of the hen, nutrition and management related factors (Chatterjee et al., 2007; Islam and Dutta, 2010; Jones et al., 2010; Momoh et al., 2010; Isidahomen et al., 2013).