egest


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egest

(ē-jĕst′)
tr.v. egested, egesting, egests
To discharge or excrete from the body.

e·ges′tion n.
e·ges′tive adj.
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References in periodicals archive ?
We compared the germination rates of egested and noningested seeds from the consumption trials.
The impossibility of such a creation sequence was argued in my book on the premise that "planets can only come into existence given the presence of a Sun" and from that, it could be egested into space and not vice-versa.
Egested feces had distinct colorations that were related to the specific coloration of the diet to which they were exposed.
Toward the anterior of the cell, vacuoles containing particles were apparently being egested at the uroid.
Although little is known about the natural history of Anthopleura larvae in the wild, laboratory studies have shown that aposymbiotic larvae readily form associations with nonmotile symbionts naturally egested by adult anemones, lending some support to this hypothesis (Schwarz et al., 2002).
The earthworm's relatively simple digestive system, consisting of a mouth, pharynx, esophagus, crop, gizzard, and intestine, enables it to grind vegetable matter and other stray material that it ingests to produce the clay-like manure castings egested from its anus and deposited on the ground's surface.
Thus, energy is lost to the food web when the shell is produced by the mussel, and also lost when it is handled and egested by fish.
Number of pellets egested or number of prey items/pellet did not vary seasonally.
It removes potassium by exchanging sodium ions for potassium ions in the intestine before the resin is egested. This action may lead to a significant rise in serum sodium and, therefore, trigger thirst as well as fluid retention in those patients without residual renal function.