effort syndrome

orthostatic intolerance

A condition (OMIM:604715) characterised by lightheadedness, fatigue, altered mentation, syncope and tachycardia upon assuming an upright position, and markedly elevated serum norepinephrine. 

Molecular pathology
Defects in SLC6A2, which encodes a member of the sodium:neurotransmitter symporter that regulates norepinephrine homeostasis, are a cause of orthostatic intolerance.

effort syndrome

Unusual or unexpected fatigue with exertion. The fatigue is increased by mild exertion and may be more pronounced in the morning.
See: chronic fatigue syndrome

effort syndrome

See DA COSTA SYNDROME.
References in periodicals archive ?
The condition was also known as Effort Syndrome, and was attributed to several causes, including overly strenuous military duties, exposure to poison gas or disease and psychological stress.
All military conflicts have involved severe stress and although different labels have been attached in the past to reactions to war (e.g., neurasthenia, shell shock, effort syndrome, etc., many veterans consider stress and "chronic fatigue syndrome" as inadequate to explain their symptoms.
Those diagnosed with ailments, such as the vapors, neurasthenia, effort syndrome, epidemic neuromyasthenia, myalgic encephalomyelitis, multiple chemical sensitivity syndrome, chronic candidiasis, chronic mononucleosis, chronic Epstein-Barr viral infection, and postviral fatigue syndrome, probably all had what we now call chronic fatigue syndrome.
Of the 18 patients treated for spontaneous axillosubclavian vein thrombosis at the center between 1989 and 1997, 14 had exogenous risk factors including pregnancy; estrogen therapy; malignancy; and "effort syndrome," which is strenuous repetitive movement of the arms and shoulders.
Some 60,000 British troops suffered from a mysterious "effort syndrome" after World War I.