effleurage


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effleurage

 [ef″loo͡-rahzh´] (Fr.)
stroking movement in massage. During childbirth, a light circular stroke of the lower abdomen, done in rhythm to control breathing, to aid in relaxation of the abdominal muscles, and to increase concentration during a uterine contraction. The stroking is accomplished by moving the wrist only. Concentrating on the coordination of stroking and breathing is believed to block out some of the sensations created by the contracting uterus.
Effleurage.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ef·fleu·rage

(e-flĕr-ahzh'),
A stroking movement in massage.
[Fr. effleurer, to touch lightly]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

effleurage

Massage
Massage therapy in which the therapist employs long, slow, rhythmic, light and heavy pressure strokes from the fingertips, thumbs, knuckles and palms. Effleurage may be combined by some therapists with aromatherapy.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ef·fleu·rage

(ef-lūr-ahzh')
A form of massage consisting of superficial or deep long, unbroken strokes in which the hand conforms the surface and follows the fiber direction of underlying structures.
See also: pétrissage
[Fr. effleurer, to touch lightly]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The effleurage technique involves long, light or firm strokes over the spine and back.
It begins with a sweeping effleurage, working towards the heart to warm and prepare the skin for the subsequent, somewhat rougher, strokes.
The most common technique in America is known as effleurage or Swedish massage, a gentle stroking and kneading, sometimes with tapping, clapping, or similar percussive hand movements.
Although essential oils can be recovered using fermentation, extraction, or effleurage processes, commercial production is preferably achieved by the steam distillation process [1, 4, 110].
Nursing education traditionally includes basic massage techniques such as the long, light strokes known as effleurage and kneading or petrissage (Merlo, 2012).
Teaching relaxation, breathing, and effleurage at the same time can be too much for these families.
Oncology massage is therefore largely limited to effleurage type massage using fingers and palms without any localised or intense pressure.
(1995) Effleurage massage, muscle blood flow and long-term post-exercise strength recovery.
The technique of infant massage is based on four basic principles, namely: effleurage, petrissage, tapotement, and friction.
EFFLEURAGE Effleurage is where the masseur begins stroking the muscle tissues and putting massage oil on the skin.
This type of massage includes three classical movements to energise and stimulate blood flow: effleurage, a soothing, sweeping stroke; petrissage, basically grabbing hold of a handful of flesh and kneading; and tapotement - tapping, chopping and cupping.