effeminate

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effeminate

[ifem′init]
Etymology: L, effeminare, to make womanish
womanly or female in physical and mental characteristics, regardless of biological sex.

effeminate

adjective Referring to a feminine appearance and/or behaviour, especially of or by a man.

effeminate

(ĕ-fĕm′-ĭ-năt)
1. Pert. to a male who has the appearance or mannerisms traditionally considered feminine.
2. Excessively soft, delicate, or self-indulgent.
References in periodicals archive ?
3) Yet, while Carpenter willingly admitted to the social benefits of a limited "feminine element" in male inverts, since this tempers the desire for "business success, fame, and other motives which rule" the overly greedy or egotistical "normal man," a too overt or obvious effeminacy recalled the social threats of both an indolent socio-economic privilege, one akin to that idealized by the effete Wildean decadent, and a lower-class dissipation (120, 119).
The effeminate characteristics of the kalu have been discussed quite often by scholars, (5) and these may explain why a concept expressing male effeminacy such as kulu 'u could have derived from it.
Penrose's main critical contribution is to plant the flag of homoeroticism firmly in the center of the map of eighteenth-century gender and sexuality studies, challenging the reader to accept his contention that depictions of effeminacy or invocations of the hermaphroditism chiefly refer audiences to same-sex desire and sexual acts, even when/though they might reference other things as well.
Due to the phonetic similarity, the form Atti recalls the wellknown mythological figure of Attis, the lover of Cybele, who castrated himself and therefore became a symbol of effeminacy (21).
As Vidal's starkly opposing "athletes so drawn to the entirely masculine" to "transvestites or lonely bookish boys" makes clear, The City in the Pillar attempts to normalize male homosexuality by detaching it from any association with effeminacy.
This is precision but not pedantry, subtlety but not effeminacy, real solemnity and joy and not their empty substitutes.
Yet excessive passivity, and over-sensitivity to pain, is among the most obvious hallmarks of weakness and effeminacy.
Thus, for example, two staples of gay male culture are the Radical Faeries, who repudiate traditional gender norms and embrace androgynous imagery and values, and the bear community, which celebrates traditionally masculine styles and pursuits while eschewing effeminacy.
But Arthur is uncertain, haunted by Heavenly's schoolgirl taunting of his effeminacy.
Teddy Roosevelt famously rode roughshod over the perceived effeminacy of his day and thereby helped enshrine "masculinity" as the male lodestar for more than the next hundred years.
For Fletcher these texts reveal that Richard's youth and effeminacy were in reality the weapons of a political opposition which sought permanently to infantilise him and to restrict the proper resumption of royal authority.
To say that polder has an inherent pragmatism is to say that it has an inherent push or ideal effeminacy.