effeminate

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effeminate

[ifem′init]
Etymology: L, effeminare, to make womanish
womanly or female in physical and mental characteristics, regardless of biological sex.

effeminate

adjective Referring to a feminine appearance and/or behaviour, especially of or by a man.

effeminate

(ĕ-fĕm′-ĭ-năt)
1. Pert. to a male who has the appearance or mannerisms traditionally considered feminine.
2. Excessively soft, delicate, or self-indulgent.
References in periodicals archive ?
Such markers of effeminacy as his choice of toys, cherished long hair, and emulation of hyperfeminine heroines only inspire tableaux of censorship and peer abuse; they seem never to chart the tale of a boy's evolving sensibility.
Gregg, "'A Truly Christian Hero': Religion, Effeminacy, and Nation in the Writing of the Society for the Reformation of Manners," Eighteenth-Century Life 25, no.
Earlier in the century, however, before "effeminacy" was linked to the emergent construction of homosexuality, reviewers could align Tennyson with aestheticism and effeminacy without provoking anxiety.
She quotes Browning's remarks about Swinburne's "florid impotence" and the "effeminacy" of Rossetti's school and its "men that dress up like women"; and this Blain contrasts with Browning's own susceptibility to charges of effeminacy.
In the first thirty years of the century the Boy Scouts flourished, as did the Men and Religion Forward Movement, the YMCA, men's lodges and social clubs, and the National Park Service--conceived by Teddy Roosevelt to help combat what he perceived as the effeminacy of overly civilized boys and men.
The Chicago Tribune published an article called "PinkPowd er Puffs" and Valentino quite unfairly was accused of effeminacy.
REALITY: Indigenous transgenderism or effeminacy is socially accepted, but its relation to male-male sex is not openly acknowledged in this highly Christian country and former U.
Effeminacy in little boys was often viewed as a precursor to homosexuality, a connection that was bolstered by an emerging literature on the genesis of homosexuality.
Focusing on the socialist journals, Clarion and New Age, Ann Ardis continues the exploration of art and activism in her discussion of Wilde's peculiar position in the consciousness of twentieth-century socialist debates about art and culture, a debate in which he "both does and does not figure" (z75), Ardis looks at the explicit criticism by socialists of exactly the kinds of philanthropic enterprises that Maltz introduces, though that criticism may focus on intellectual decadence and effeminacy rather than on voyeurism.
In my years of seminary formation, the most controversial conference was given by my own Bishop, Robert Carlson, on the vice of effeminacy.
Latrigue's lifelong boyishness--captured in his journal entry at the age of six when he writes, "Dear Jesus, please make me stay small"--has nothing to do with homosexuality, or even with effeminacy.
Attitudes about race, effeminacy, and transgenderism are a factor.