effeminate

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effeminate

[ifem′init]
Etymology: L, effeminare, to make womanish
womanly or female in physical and mental characteristics, regardless of biological sex.

effeminate

adjective Referring to a feminine appearance and/or behaviour, especially of or by a man.

effeminate

(ĕ-fĕm′-ĭ-năt)
1. Pert. to a male who has the appearance or mannerisms traditionally considered feminine.
2. Excessively soft, delicate, or self-indulgent.
References in periodicals archive ?
3) Yet, while Carpenter willingly admitted to the social benefits of a limited "feminine element" in male inverts, since this tempers the desire for "business success, fame, and other motives which rule" the overly greedy or egotistical "normal man," a too overt or obvious effeminacy recalled the social threats of both an indolent socio-economic privilege, one akin to that idealized by the effete Wildean decadent, and a lower-class dissipation (120, 119).
It may be suggested that by the Middle Assyrian period it was widely established that the Istar cult was comprised of, among other attendants, effeminate men, so that a general term conveying the notion of male effeminacy was considered by the Assyrian scribes of the period to be suitable for describing any member of the cult of this goddess.
Due to the phonetic similarity, the form Atti recalls the wellknown mythological figure of Attis, the lover of Cybele, who castrated himself and therefore became a symbol of effeminacy (21).
As Vidal's starkly opposing "athletes so drawn to the entirely masculine" to "transvestites or lonely bookish boys" makes clear, The City in the Pillar attempts to normalize male homosexuality by detaching it from any association with effeminacy.
To say that polder has an inherent pragmatism is to say that it has an inherent push or ideal effeminacy.
The early modern bachelor, then, was loosely and negatively defined; he represented various masculinities; his nineteenth-century descendant's potential selfishness, luxury (topically understood as effeminacy or licentiousness), and civic uselessness evidently concerned his society and its authors because his position vis-a-vis the manhood question was unclear.
s dog has died, nobody came to the burial, and his pianist friend, Beethoven (Wyatt Fenner), is tormented at school for his effeminacy.
His effeminacy resembles on the one hand a kind of impotence, a weakness and naivety .
Even so, presumed passivity or effeminacy in men merited social backlash.
Priuli links effeminacy and sodomy to the calamitous events of the League of Cambrai, and to natural disasters such as pestilence and earthquakes.
the intellectual traditions, the free constitutions, and the old heartiness of our civilized society; it would be forthrightly opposed to political collectivism, social decadence, and effeminacy in thought and literature.
The aristocratic leisure of the undead invokes the stereotypes of luxury, decadence, idleness and effeminacy that are a major part of the dominant culture's homophobic fiction" (Keller 33).