efface


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efface

(ĭ-fās′)
v. ef·faced, ef·facing, ef·faces
v.tr.
Medicine To cause to become shorter, softer, and thinner during labor: The cervix was effaced as the contractions continued.
v.intr.
Medicine To become shorter, softer, and thinner during labor. Used of the cervix.

ef·face′a·ble adj.
ef·face′ment n.
ef·fac′er n.
References in periodicals archive ?
mountains, oil derricks efface prairies, highways are erased by mile
Le debut de semaine en cours a ete marque par un redressement pour le dinar tunisien qui efface une partie de ses pertes de la semaine derniere.
STARTING POSITION: Fifth position efface, right foot front; right arm holds the top corner of a chair; left arm is lowered into fifth en bas.
To take refuge in the absurd promise of mercy from God disrupts any totalizing schemas that efface what cannot be incorporated.
Thus, in Him He was able to begin the history of redemption, because God has the power to efface sin.
He said: "Every effort must be made to efface all signs of occupation in every way".
Coleman questions Ellison's ardent belief that the "twoness" of the dyadic "African-American" can be reconciled when blacks embrace principles of democracy and individuality--that the "Negro's" inexorable "Americaness" will somehow efface the negativity inherently implied in "blackness." Subsequently, Coleman illustrates how Ellison's literary heirs Wideman and Johnson alternatively imagine new vistas for black American manhood while simultaneously "fail[ing] to center liberating black realities to counter and close out harmful white ones.
daytrippers and efface the region's real historical heritage of carefully preserved Civil War battlefields.
God is what sleep cannot efface but never shows his face except when I
The rib cage is pushed forward, arms are behind the torso, and there is a general tendency to be too flat-that is, true efface and croise are missing.