educational audiologist

educational audiologist

An audiologist who works in a school and who screens pupils for evidence of hearing loss that may affect their ability to learn.
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Daisy Monticelli, whose 5-year-old daughter Marenpreviously had received mapping services in Eugene, said she now takes her daughter to Portland to see an educational audiologist, who works primarily with children with cochlear implants.
Tschirgi cites a study conducted by Laurie Allen, an educational audiologist in Dubuque, IA, who surveyed 334 students in grades 1 to 6 about amplified classrooms.
Results support the importance of an educational audiologist on the service delivery team to help teachers understand the ramifications of MHL and assist in meeting the educational and psychosocial needs of students with this type of loss.
Results may serve as an important step in (a) advocating for the inclusion of an educational audiologist on the service delivery team; (b) allowing the educational audiologist to provide information and assistance to teachers who have students with MHL in their classrooms; (c) optimizing hearing screening procedures; and (d) reinforcing, particularly to school administrators, the need for collaborative efforts to optimize educational opportunities for children with MHL.
This information can be readily obtained from collaboration with an educational audiologist.
These models consist of (a) a full-time educational audiologist on staff with the school district; (b) an audiologist who follows student progress and provides consultant services for the school district; (c) a combination of a full-time educational audiologist assisted by a consultant audiologist who specializes in a specific area; and (d) a protocol in which an educational audiologist consults, although a school-based SLP is the primary team member organizing intervention for students with MHL.
Each of these models incorporates the services of an educational audiologist.
The documented adverse effects of hearing loss on the education, behavior, and psychosocial development of children are some of the reasons that educational audiologists play a pivotal role in working with teachers for effective classroom intervention (Flexer, 1994; Jarvelin, Maki-Torkko, Sorri, & Rantakallio, 1997; Nittrouer, 1996; Northern & Downs, 2002).
There is a need for students in audiology graduate programs (AuD students) to understand the important role of educational audiologists and to appreciate the fact that work in the schools is equally as important as work in health-care and industrial settings.
Data support the educational and financial benefits of teachers' collaboration with educational audiologists (McCormick Richburg & Goldberg, 2005).
In this way, the community partners would experience the benefits that educational audiologists can provide to a school, the teachers, and the students with hearing loss.
In this issue, they discuss the perceptions of teachers regarding those beliefs as they relate to children with minimal hearing loss and the role of educational audiologists on the service-delivery team.
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