edaphic factor

edaphic factor

any characteristic of the environment resulting from the physical, chemical or biotic components of the soil.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
It has long been recognized that besides climate, the edaphic factor chiefly drives the geographic distribution of plant species (Good, 1931).
The edaphic factor, related to poor soils is also of great importance.
There are several factors that may influence the abundance, activity, composition and diversity of the edaphic fauna, such as edaphic factors (soil type, predominant minerals, temperature, pH, organic matter, humidity, texture and structure), those related to vegetation (physiognomy and cover), and historical (especially anthropic but also geological), topographical (physiographic position, inclination) and climatic factors (rainfall, temperature, wind, relative air humidity) (Machado et al., 2015).
In contrast to the results of this study, the tiller number of Tef may reach up to 18 toughs; and is influenced by population density, the variety of the crop and other edaphic factors, and agro-ecology [13].
Seasonal abundance of soil arthropods in relation to meteorological and edaphic factors in the agroecosystems of Faisalabad, Punjab, Pakistan.
Similarly, elegant transplant experiments conducted by the British Ecological Society from the 1920s to the 1930s highlighted edaphic factors as potent agents of selection (Marsden-Jones & Turrill, 1938).
The data sets pertaining to herbaceous and shrubby vegetation and edaphic factors were subjected to three type of multivariate analysis i.e., TWINSPAN (Two-way Indicator Species Analysis), DCA (Detrended Correspondence Analysis) and CCA (Canonical Correspondence Analysis).
Edaphic factors and distribution of vegetation in the Cholistan desert, Pakistan.
The consistency indicated earlier is apparent in the predominant role played by edaphic factors with respect to climate-related factors in explaining the distribution of the study communities.
In Pindo palms associated with restinga vegetation, where limitations in fruit yield resulted from edaphic factors inherent to the habitat, a more conservative and restrictive management strategy needs to be adopted.