ectothrix

ectothrix

 [ek´to-thriks]
a fungus that grows inside the shaft of a hair, but produces a conspicuous external sheath of spores.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ec·to·thrix

(ek'tō-thriks),
A sheath of spores (conidia) on the outside of a hair.
[ecto- + G. thrix, hair]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ec·to·thrix

(ek'tō-thriks)
A sheath of spores (conidia) on the outside of a hair.
[ecto- + G. thrix, hair]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(6,7) Wood lamp examination will fluoresce if there are ectothrix species; however, a negative fluorescence does not differentiate between an endothrix species or lack of infection.
While invading hair, the dermatophytes follow one of several precise patterns of growth: In small spore ectothrix type of hair invasion, for example by M.
In large spore ectothrix type, for example by Trichophyton verrucosum and T.
On the other hand, the observations of fungal filaments with Arthroconidia, Ectothrix or Endothrix, and the fungal filaments in hair shaft were indicative of the Dermatophytosis and Tinea Faciei.
Diagnosis of dermatophytes in hair pieces was made by the visualisation of arthroconidia arranged along the length of the hair in chains or masses around the hair (ectothrix infection) or in the hair substance (endothrix infection).
On high-power magnification, hyphae are seen within the hair shaft in endothrix tinea or in a cuff outside the hair shaft in ectothrix tinea.
The samples were kept for 20 minutes and then examined for the presence of ectothrix or endothrix spores in addition to filamentous, septate, branched hyphae with or without arthrospores and trichospores.
Historically, when the majority of tinea capitis infections in the United States were caused by the Microsporum species, a Wood's lamp examination was helpful in assisting providers in diagnosing tinea capitis; the Microsporum species would fluoresce when examined using a Wood's lamp due to the formation of a sheath by fungal spores on the outside of the hair shaft (ectothrix).
The following year Gruby described Trichophyton ectothrix, another fungi, found at the roots of a man's beard.
Comma hairs, which are slightly curved and fractured hair shafts, are associated with ectothrix and endothrix type fungal invasion.
canis, an ectothrix, grow on the outside of the hair shaft and produce a substance that fluoresces green under a Wood's Lamp.