ectotherm


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ectotherm

 [ek´to-therm″]
1. an animal that exhibits ectothermy.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ectotherm

(ĕk′tə-thûrm′)
n.
An organism that depends on external sources for its body heat.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ectotherm

(ek'to-therm?) [ ecto- + therm-] Cold-blooded animal.ectothermic (ek?to-ther'mik), adjective
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

ectotherm

a cold-blooded animal. see POIKILOTHERM.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Ectotherms are dependent on the environment to adjust their body temperature, unlike endotherms, giving ambient temperature a fundamental influence on their life histories.
Size-fecundity relationships, growth trajectories, and the temperature-size rule for ectotherms. Evolution 65:43-51.
Within terrestrial systems endotherms displayed larger trophic breadths and smaller vulnerability values than ectotherms on the same trophic level (Fig.
Converse Bergmannian clines are much more frequent in ectotherms than in endotherms, especially in insects (Brennan & Fairbairn 1995, Mousseau 1997, Fischer & Fiedler 2002, Blanckenhorn & Demont 2004, Bidau & Marti 2007b).
Behavioral implications of mechanistic ecology: thermal and behavioral modeling of desert ectotherms and their microenvironment.
Temperature is one of the most important environmental factors controlling development in ectotherms including echinoderms, which progress faster through their developmental stages as temperature increases (Hoegh-Guldberg & Pearse 1995).
However, the appearance of spatial trends in body size for ectotherms [2], including vertebrates [17-19], is still disputed [13,20-23].
Thus, we use natural variation in climate modes related to the Pacific Northwest to test whether these modes will have an impact on the life history of terrestrial ectotherms, in particular reptiles.
(1993) have suggested a conceptual framework for exploring thermoregulation by comparing the body temperatures ([T.sub.b]) selected by an ectotherm to the available thermal environment and the preferred body temperature range of the animal in a thermal gradient.
Ectotherm life-history responses to developmental temperature.
Plethodontid salamanders do not confirm to "general rules" for ectotherm life histories: insights from allocation models about why simple models do not make accurate predictions.