ectopic fat


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ectopic fat

Fat that collects in abnormal locations in the body and adversely affects health. These locations include: the liver (steatohepatitis), muscle (marbling), and around the intraperitoneal organs (visceral fat).
See also: fat
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Enigmatic ectopic fat: prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease and its associated factors in a Chinese population.
Moors et al., "Ectopic fat storage in the pancreas, liver, and abdominal fat depots: impact on [beta]-cell function in individuals with impaired glucose metabolism," The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, vol.
It can be inferred that the activation of and shift in monocyte polarity from an anti-inflammatory to a proinflammatory phenotype upon increased ectopic fat deposition are mediated by CD36, which in turn leads to increased expression of CD36 on the plasma membrane [5,14, 20, 21].
Many studies demonstrate that obese individuals often have enlarged adipocytes with overloaded lipid content and excess lipids "spill over" from the incompetent and dysfunctional adipose tissue, thereby exposing other tissues to an excessive influx of lipids, leading to ectopic fat deposition [6].
Elevated sugar/energy intake is a predisposing condition to MetS development due to increasing adiposity [23] and the link between high sugar/energy intake and metabolic abnormalities seems to be the ectopic fat deposition [24].
This so-called "ectopic fat deposition" contributes to the development of metabolic syndrome [6-12].
A Palaeolithic-type diet causes strong tissue-specific effects on ectopic fat deposition in obese postmenopausal women.
Similar to fat accumulation in the liver, obesity and metabolic syndrome result in ectopic fat deposition in other organ systems including skeletal muscles, the heart, and the pancreas.
My work for more than 25 years has focused on one form of "obesity": overweight and moderately obese individuals who have too much body fat stored in the wrong place (referred to as ectopic fat depots, such as excess visceral adipose tissue and liver fat).
(See "Insulin Resistance.") Ectopic fat may block the signal, suggest studies at Yale and elsewhere.
Regarding the "unexpected" finding that extremity fat was protective against elevated ALT, the researchers postulated that the "uptake and storage of free fatty acids by femoral adipose tissue could lead to protection of other organs such as the liver from exposure to fatty acids and ectopic fat deposition."
(9,10) Leptin initially limits abdominal fat deposition (ectopic fat or visceral adipose tissue, VAT, see Figures 3 and 4).