ecthyma


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Related to ecthyma: erysipelas, cellulitis, impetigo, erythrasma, ecthyma contagiosum, ecthyma gangrenosum

ecthyma

 [ek-thi´mah]
an ulcerative pyoderm usually caused by group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection at the site of minor trauma, predominantly involving the shins and feet, and generally healing with variable scar formation.
ecthyma gangreno´sum a condition most often seen in debilitated patients in association with septicemia caused by gram-negative organisms, characterized by lesions that begin as vesicles that rapidly progress to pustulation and gangrenous ulcers with undermined purpuric edges.

ec·thy·ma

(ek-thī'mă),
A pyogenic infection of the skin initiated by β-hemolytic streptococci and characterized by adherent crusts beneath which ulceration occurs; the ulcers may be single or multiple, and heal with scar formation.
[G. a pustule]

ecthyma

/ec·thy·ma/ (ek-thi´mah) a shallowly ulcerative form of impetigo, chiefly on the shins or forearms.

ecthyma

[ek′thimə]
Etymology: Gk, ek, out, thyein, to rush
an ulcerative pyoderma characterized by large pustules, crusts, and ulcerations surrounded by erythema. It is caused by a streptococcal infection after a minor trauma. The skin of the legs is most frequently affected. Treatment includes vigorous cleansing, application of compresses of cool Burow's solution to soften and remove crusts, and systemic administration of antibiotics. Compare folliculitis, impetigo.
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Ecthyma

ecthyma

Dermatology A chronic subcutaneous infection by β-hemolytic streptococci that develops usually on the legs, in a background of a pruritic lesion–eg, insect bite, scabies, pediculosis; skin becomes crusted, weeping, and later scarred Management Warm compresses, antibacterial soap, H2O2, systemic penicillin. See Impetigo.

ec·thy·ma

(ek-thī'mă)
A pyogenic infection of the skin initiated by β-hemolytic streptococci and characterized by adherent crusts beneath which ulceration occurs; the ulcers heal with scar formation.
[G. a pustule]

ecthyma

A pus-forming, ulcerating and crusting inflammatory skin disease, similar to IMPETIGO, often affecting the forearms and legs of malnourished people.

ecthyma

a shallowly eruptive form of impetigo.

contagious ecthyma
a specific dermatitis of sheep caused by a poxvirus in the genus Parapoxvirus. The virus is strongly antigenic and an attack of the disease or vaccination provides long-lasting immunity. If the flock has previously been exposed the disease is restricted in occurrence to lambs and young sheep. The characteristic lesions occur mostly on the lips and the skin around the mouth, but have appeared wherever skin contact has been made with a source of infective virus, e.g. ear tagging, tail docking. Lesions are first papules, then crusts, and finally discrete thick tenacious scabs over vigorous granulation tissue. Very young lambs develop an extensive form of the disease involving even the alimentary tract. Occasional older sheep also have extensive lesions on other skin areas such as the coronets, and at the other mucocutaneous junctions. The disease is transmissible to humans. Called also orf, scabby mouth, contagious pustular dermatitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Histopathological analysis of the skin lesion on the right hip revealed ecthyma gangrenosum.
Lesions usually have a necrotic center resembling ecthyma gangrenosum and are described as ecthyma gangrenosum-like lesions (3).
Ecthyma gangrenosum: considerations in a previously healthy child.
Multiple erythematous nodules and ecthyma gangrenosum as a manifestation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis in a previously healthy infant.
Ecthyma gangrenosum without bacteraemia in a leukaemic patient.
Skin signs include diffuse maculopapular lesions and painful clusters of small vesicles or pustules, as well as ecthyma gangrenosum, which is an aggressive, rapidly evolving necrotic lesion of the skin and mucous membranes.
Ecthyma gangrenosum has been reported in 1 to 6% of patients with P aeruginosa bacteremia, and less often in nonbacteremic patients.
Although ecthyma gangrenosum is most often associated with P aeruginosa, it has also been described in infections with Staphylococcus aureus, Aerornonas hydrophilia, and Aspergillus, Mucor, and Serratia spp.
Cutaneous lesions in disseminated candidiasis mimicking ecthyma gangrenosum.
Yamamoto Y Ecthyma vulgare, ecthyma gangrenosum, chancriform pyoderma.
Confusing clinical signs in sheep underline the need for developing diagnostic tests to discriminate between bluetongue and other confounding diseases such as contagious ecthyma, border disease, and foot-and-mouth disease.
The differential diagnosis of cutaneous anthrax includes brown recluse spider bite, ecthyma, ulceroglandular tularemia, accidental vaccinia, and necrotic herpes simplex.