ecstasy


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ecstasy

(eks'tă-sē), Avoid the misspellings ecstacy and exstasy.
1. The popular name for 304 methylenedioxymethamphetamine.
2. A drug of abuse, used at clubs, raves, and rock concerts. This agent was first synthesized in Germany in the early 1900s and used during World War I to induce soldiers to charge from the line of trenches into the line of fire. It acts acutely to increase energy, provide a sense of camaraderie and attachment, increase sexual desire, and induce euphoria. Besides sexual side effects, produces increased heart rate, chills, seating, dehyration, and various strictly psychiatric symptoms. Dosages not much higher than recreational amounts can be toxic to serotonergic and other neurons. Long-term use associated with changes in serotonergic neurons may predispose an abuser to long-term psychiatric symptoms.
3. Mental exaltation, and/or a rapturous experience.

ecstasy

(ĕk′stə-sē)
n. pl. ecsta·sies
often Ecstasy Slang MDMA.

ecstasy

Hug drug, love drug Substance abuse An oral designer analogue of amphetamine, a 'schedule I' controlled substance which may be fatal due to heat exhaustion and dehydration, combination with methadone, LSD, opiates–eg, heroin or Fentanyl, or anesthetics–eg, Ketamine; it is a popular 'recreational' drug of abuse, especially in a dance-party–see Rave–setting; at moderate doses, it causes euphoria, sense of well-being, enhanced mental or emotional clarity; at higher doses, hallucinations, sensations of lightness, depression, paranoid thinking, violent behavior Toxicity Serotonin neurotoxicity, sweating, dilated pupils, blurred vision, tachycardia, arrhythmias, fever, spasticity, hypotension, bronchospasm, acidosis, anorexia, N&V, HTN, faintness, chills, insomnia, convulsions, loss of voluntary muscle control, anxiety, or paranoia. See Designer drugs, 'Ice. ', Rave party. Cf Eve.

ec·sta·sy

(ek'stă-sē)
A drug of abuse used especially at clubs and raves; increases energy, heightens sexual urges, and induces euphoria. Even small recreational dosage can lead to hazardous reactions.

ecstasy

A popular name for the drug 3,4-methylene dioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), a hallucinogenic amphetamine with effects that are a combination of those of LSD and amphetamine (amfetamine). Ecstasy is widely used to promote an appropriate state of mind at ‘rave’ all-night dance session, but the combination of strenuous physical exercise and the direct toxic effect of the drug has led to a number of deaths in young people. Such death result from an uncontrolled rise in body temperature (hyperthermia), kidney failure, muscle breakdown (rhabdomyolysis) and sometimes liver failure. Urgent measures to reduce body core temperature can save life. The drug can also precipitate a persistent paranoid PSYCHOSIS. Claims that ecstasy can damage the dopamine system of the brain and cause Parkinson's disease have been discredited.

ec·sta·sy

(ek'stă-sē)
A drug of abuse, used at clubs, raves, and rock concerts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Interviewees attributed their declining ecstasy use to the fact that they were going to raves and other social events less often and were therefore growing out of the ecstasy scene.
Ecstasy, formally known as MDMA, is a Class A drug which means people found in possession of it can potentially face up to seven years in prison, an unlimited fine, or both.
A small nonprofit, (http://www.maps.org/) The Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies , that advocates the legal medical use of Ecstasy, has sponsored six Phase 2 studies in treating a total of 130 patients with PTSD with the drug.
There are several theories that have been tested with substance abuse and other behaviors in college students that can be reified for prevention of ecstasy use.
She said Rose's behaviour became increasingly erratic through the evening and at one point she told her she had consumed five Ecstasy tablets.
Scientists don't know if memory skills would bounce back when Ecstasy use stopped, for instance, or whether the severity of the memory problem scales with the amount of Ecstasy used.
Ecstasy - known scientifically as 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine or MDMA - is a stimulant and hallucinogen and one of the most widely used illegal drugs among young people, with a range of damaging effects.
Prof Cowan pointed out that ecstasy, which has the chemical name MDMA, is now being tested as a treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder and anxiety linked to cancer.
In this article, we use data from a larger study of MDMA and sexual risk taking to explore the use of MDMA (3, 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine or Ecstasy) for sell-medication of stressful life situations, including family and partner conflicts and/or histories of violence or abuse in an ethnically diverse group of Ecstasy-using urban young adults.
The spokesman said: "If there is a batch of strong and deadly ecstasy tablets going around then there is always the chance they are here.
Theologian Colleen Shantz wrote Paul in Ecstasy to draw attention to religious experiences such as visions or revelations.
Summary: Ecstasy is more likely to kill young, healthy people than other stimulants such as speed and crystal meth, a new study has found.