economies of scale


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economies of scale

reduced cost of production per unit as the number of units produced increases.
References in periodicals archive ?
How economies of scale affect that balancing act is the subject of this article.
Leband and Lentz (2003) suggested that economies of scale can be utilized at the department level as well.
The existence of economies of scale in nursing homes is largely confirmed on the basis of previous studies (Fried & Schmidt, 1998; Li-Wu Chen & Shea, 2004; McKay, 1988).
Liu's second article deals with economies of scale of academic research libraries.
The economic payoff for Madrick comes when the mass employment of these innovations produces new economies of scale.
The use of a gross profit multiplier that is affected by market share and sales trends speaks directly to not only the value of the brands, but also the economies of scale (also known as the ability to produce a profit) the acquiring distributor will achieve.
The answer to that question, if you think about it as an hourglass with the economies of scale as the critical point here, is that it's only when you look at it in that context that you can turn the technology question around and ask about value to business, because it will be in the context of how it affects those economies of scale.
Integrated delivery systems initially benefited from economies of scale as ancillary services, such as laboratory, laundry, and maintenance, were consolidated.
The question then arises as to whether there are product-specific economies of scale for these separate utilities.
Economists theorize that bigger may be better if economies of scale exist.
Several major "mergers" have characterized the sector in recent years, as companies sought economies of scale to boost operating margins.