economic credentialing


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economic credentialing

(e″kŏ-nom′ik, ē″)
The use of data about a health care provider's asset generation or resource utilization to determine whether that provider should be given clinical privileges in a hospital or health maintenance organization.
References in periodicals archive ?
Still, Ramsey wanted documents from The Health Law Firm involving the economic credentialing issue connected with Baptist.
to the ulterior motivations of economic credentialing, (13) and how it
The hospital can reinternalize costs through at least three different mechanisms: economic credentialing, exclusive or bundled-discount managed care contracting, and vertical integration of hospitals and physicians.
It is clear that HMOs" pay-for-performance plans are a pretense for economic credentialing. Beneath their pretense of improving quality, their real motive is to further their control over our practice of medicine.
Clearly, HMOs' pay-for-performance plans are a pretense for economic credentialing. Under the false pretense of improving quality, their real motive is to further control our practice of medicine.
Debates about the merits of economic credentialing are often confused by a lack of clear-cut definitions.
This last tactic, commonly referred to as "economic credentialing," has significantly raised tensions between hospitals and physician-owners in the communities in which the practice has occurred.
Dahl of the University of Iowa, Iowa City, has won first place in the graduate division of the American College of Healthcare Executives' (ACHE) 1999 Hill-Rom Management Essay Competition in Healthcare Administration for his essay, "Economic Credentialing: The Propriety of Managing Physician Costs through Privileging." In the undergraduate division, Julie E.
The use of this information for economic credentialing or public release of physician-specific data are just two of the concerns.
But, as has been said, "While economic credentialing once was limited to reviewing doctors' utilization profiles--arguably a quality issue--it has grown bolder."(25) Recent cases range from the granting of exclusive contracts and the removal of privileges of already practicing physicians, to admissions that privileges are being denied solely for financial reasons.
(2) The intensity of this contentiousness has flared up considerably in recent years, as hospitals reportedly are increasingly adopting or considering "economic credentialing" policies.
Thornton had some advice for hospital compliance officers, warning them about the use of 'economic credentialing.' "Requiring a minimum level of practice to ensure proficiency is fine, but asking the doctor to refer 50% of his patients is going too far," he said.

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