ecosystem

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ecosystem

 [e″ko-sis´tem]
the fundamental unit in ecology, comprising the living organisms and the nonliving elements interacting in a certain defined area.

e·co·sys·tem

(ē'kō-sis-tem),
1. The fundamental unit in ecology, comprising the living organisms and the nonliving elements that interact in a defined region.
2. A biocenosis (biotic community) and its biotope.
Synonym(s): ecologic system

ecosystem

(ē′kō-sĭs′təm, ĕk′ō-)
n.
An ecological community together with its environment, functioning as a unit.

ecosystem

[ek′ōsis′təm]
the total of all living things within a particular area and the nonliving things with which they interact.

e·co·sys·tem

(ē'kō-sis-tĕm)
1. The fundamental unit in ecology, comprising the living organisms and the nonliving elements that interact in a defined region.
2. A biocenosis (biotic community) and its biotope.

ecosystem

an ecological system that includes all the organisms (the biotic component) and the non-living (or abiotic) component of their environment within which they occur naturally.

e·co·sys·tem

(ē'kō-sis-tĕm)
Fundamental unit in ecology, comprising living and nonliving elements that interact in a defined region.

ecosystem,

n the sum total of all living and nonliving things that support the chain of life events within a particular area.

ecosystem

the fundamental unit in ecology, comprising the living organisms and the nonliving elements interacting in a certain defined area. In more sophisticated terms, a biotic community living in its biotope.
References in periodicals archive ?
DISCUSSION: The literature provides substantial evidence on single environmental factors and simple conditions that increase vulnerability or reduce resilience for humans and ecologic systems.
This type of stress is not restricted to humans but can occur in ecologic systems with the imposition of such factors as increased predators and habitat degradation or crowding.
Today, human practices, widening social inequities, and changes in ecologic systems and climate are compounding and conspiring to unleash a barrage of emerging diseases that afflict humans, livestock, wildlife, marine organisms, and the very habitat we depend upon.
Ecotoxic effects of endocrine disruptors on amphibians as a taxonomic group in ecologic systems warrant attention.
The study, which ran through 1999 and 2000 and was published in the 15 March 2002 issue of Environmental Science & Technology, focused on establishing the first snapshot of concentrations of the selected chemicals; it made no attempt to assess the implications of the findings regarding human health or ecologic systems.

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