ecogenetic

ecogenetic

(ē-kō-jen'ik),
Referring to a situation arising from a combination of ecologic and genetic factors.
[eco- + genetic]
References in periodicals archive ?
In terms of real communities, despite the fact that the vegetation has a significant amount of time to complete the ecogenetic transformation of ecotopes, the climax usually does not occupy large territories, rarely prevails in the area of other communities, and is almost absent in many areas [7, 8].
In order to steady state of soil and preserve ecogenetic soil diversity, a number of measures are needed, including soil conservation.
Awad, Ecogenetic diversity and survivorship of Abies cilicica populations in Lebanon [M.S.
The Colored, EcoGenetic Relationship Map (CEGRM): A conceptual approach and tool for genetic counseling research.
The final section deals with the social implications of ecogenetic data as well as the applications of these data to risk assessment and risk management, public health, and regulatory policies.
Specific hereditary susceptibility has now evolved into the field of ecogenetics. If you have ever pondered why an individual is at greater risk for a specific disease, or sensitive to a specific drug, then Gene-Environment Interactions is for you.
There are quite prominent examples of ecogenetic relationships between variation in susceptibility and the infectious agents of malaria, TB, HIV-AIDS, cholera, and meningitis-otitis.
After decades of polarized views pitting "genetic" versus "environmental" or "nature" versus "nurture" as the cause of various diseases, there is now widespread recognition that the more appropriate concept is "ecogenetics"--the realization that interacting genetic and environmental factors together influence predisposition to, or resistance to, developing specific diseases.
Models for the evolution of such site fidelity, or philopatry, fall broadly into three groups: ecological, ecogenetic, and genetic (Greenwood 1987).
Ecogenetic analysis and evolutionarily stable strategies in harvested populations.
Moreover, in intraspecific studies, molecular phylogenetic relationships may be incorporated into a partial Mantel test to test whether features are significantly associated with ecological factors (implying ecogenetic adaptation by natural selection) free of phylogenetic effects.
However, attempts to interpret a morphological phylogenetic tree (Thorpe 1985b) in terms of colonization sequence are compromised by ecogenetic adaptation to current selective pressures influencing the tree.