echolocation


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Related to echolocation: Human echolocation

ech·o·lo·ca·tion

(ek'ō-lō-kā'shŭn),
Term applied to the method by which bats direct their flight and avoid solid objects. The creatures emit high-pitched cries that, though inaudible to human ears, are heard by the bats themselves as reflected sounds (echoes) from objects in their path.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

echolocation

the means by which objects are identified through echoes returned from very high frequency sound emissions. Bats use such a system to avoid objects in flight and to locate prey, as do toothed whales and dolphins.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
We compared morphology and echolocation calls among populations by using discriminant analyses (DA).
To navigate through the dark, bats rely heavily on echolocation, where they emit high-frequency sounds and use the returning echoes to detect, classify, and localise objects in their environment.
In this study, three blind adults - expertly trained in echolocation since the age of 15 or younger - were studied.
Effects of interindividual variation in echolocation calls on identification of Big Brown and Silver-haired Bats.
Morphology, echolocation and resource partitioning in insectivorous bats.
Echolocation, or biological sonar, is used by all the world's toothed whales such as dolphins, sperm whales and orcas.
Echolocation refers to special sense that allows whales to navigate in turbid water and into the darkest depths of the sea.
The system, based on physiology of the insectivorous horseshoe bat, involves dynamic echolocation. The fleshy nose of the bat, which emits its ultrasonic chirps, warps constantly during flight; the change in shape subtly changes the frequency of echolocation pulses.
"Our experiments show that echolocation is not just a tool to help visually-impaired individuals navigate their environment, but can act as an effective sensory replacement for vision, allowing them to recognize the shape, size, and material properties of objects" says Mel Goodale.
Beluga produce typical delphinid broad-band echolocation clicks with center frequencies between 50 kHz and 110 kHz, while harbor porpoise produce typical phocoenid narrow-band high frequency clicks with a center frequency of 110 to 150 kHz.
It has new information on the response of the hippocampus neurons to remembering previously seen film clips, attention in a dynamic environment, attention maps in the brain, load theory and inattentional blindness, brain damage and landmarks and wayfinding, event boundaries, color and depth perception, the temporal coding of pitch, brain activity in blind people during echolocation, speech perception, somatosensory mirror phenomena, chemotopic coding in the olfactory bulb, and other topics.
Panoptes UAV, a Cambridge, Massachusetts-based start-up, has created a system that uses echolocation to help small quad-copters avoid collisions.