echolalia

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echolalia

 [ek″o-la´le-ah]
stereotyped repetition of another person's words or phrases, seen in some cases of schizophrenia, particularly in catatonic schizophrenia, in Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome, and in neurological disorders such as transcortical aphasia.

ech·o·la·li·a

(ek'ō-lā'lē-ă),
Involuntary parrotlike repetition of a word or sentence just spoken by another person. Usually seen with schizophrenia.
[echo + G. lalia, a form of speech]

echolalia

(ĕk′ō-lā′lē-ə)
n.
The repetition of words or phrases spoken by others, often occurring in people with autism spectrum disorder and certain other mental disorders.

ech′o·la′lic (-lĭk) adj.

echolalia

Neurology The parroting by a Pt of another person's words or speech fragments

ech·o·la·li·a

(ek'ō-lā'lē-ă)
Involuntary parrotlike repetition of a word or sentence just spoken by someone else; usually seen in schizophrenia.
Synonym(s): echophrasia.
[echo + G. lalia, a form of speech]

echolalia

The involuntary, parrot-like repetition of words or phrases, spoken by another person. Echolalia may occur as a feature of schizophrenia or as part of a severe tic disorder.

Echolalia

Involuntary echoing of the last word, phrase, or sentence spoken by someone else or sound in the environment.
Mentioned in: Tourette Syndrome

ech·o·la·li·a

(ek'ō-lā'lē-ă)
Involuntary parrotlike repetition of something just spoken by another person.
[echo + G. lalia, a form of speech]
References in periodicals archive ?
His speech was, however, at times still repetitive, echolalic and situationally inappropriate.
One of Sacks's post-encephalitic subjects responded to a dose of the drug L-dopa by becoming uncontrollably echolalic, giving the impression of a "hollow, untenanted, ghost-filled house, as if she herself had become 'dispossessed' by echoes and ghosts" (Awakenings 189).
The literature on decreasing or eliminating echolalic responding in developmentally disabled persons is extensive (e.g., Barrera, Sulzer-Azaroff, 1983; Charlop, 1983; McMorrow & Foxx, 1986; McMorrow, Foxx, Faw, & Bittle, 1987; Risley & Wolf, 1987).
Full recoveries such as those described by Lovaas are uncommon, he adds, and occur mainly among children who are echolalic rather than nonverbal and who have IQs above 50.
They had no speech or any other specific means of communication (Glen) or showed some echolalic expressions but with no obvious communication goals (Hugh).
Similarly, we might consider the effects on family functioning of a child with ASD who never develops speech or a symbolic language system or whose dominant means of communication is echolalic relative to a child with ASD who has a well-developed repertoire of speech.
In addition, she was coached to reflect her child's echolalic comments in order to keep him in the lead.
Use of peer model in language training in an echolalic child.
In addition, a consensus panel of the American Academy of Neurology suggested recently that a child with any of the five following symptoms should be evaluated: no babbling by 12 months; no gesturing, pointing, or waving good-bye by 12 months; no single words by 16 months; no two words spoken together spontaneously by 24 months (not echolalic); any loss of language or social skills at any time.
Lack of acquisition of the following milestones within known accepted and established ranges is considered abnormal: no babbling by 12 months, no gesturing (e.g., pointing, waving bye-bye) by 12 months; no single words by 16 months; no 2-word spontaneous (not just echolalic) phrases by 24 months; and any loss of language or social skills at any age.
had a form of echolalic speech so he frequently repeated phrases that were out of context, e.g.
Eighty percent of the students had no verbal language skills, whereas 20 percent were either echolalic (they repeated what was said by other people) or produced nonpurposeful sound utterances.