echolalia


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echolalia

 [ek″o-la´le-ah]
stereotyped repetition of another person's words or phrases, seen in some cases of schizophrenia, particularly in catatonic schizophrenia, in Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome, and in neurological disorders such as transcortical aphasia.

ech·o·la·li·a

(ek'ō-lā'lē-ă),
Involuntary parrotlike repetition of a word or sentence just spoken by another person. Usually seen with schizophrenia.
[echo + G. lalia, a form of speech]

echolalia

(ĕk′ō-lā′lē-ə)
n.
The repetition of words or phrases spoken by others, often occurring in people with autism spectrum disorder and certain other mental disorders.

ech′o·la′lic (-lĭk) adj.

echolalia

Neurology The parroting by a Pt of another person's words or speech fragments

ech·o·la·li·a

(ek'ō-lā'lē-ă)
Involuntary parrotlike repetition of a word or sentence just spoken by someone else; usually seen in schizophrenia.
Synonym(s): echophrasia.
[echo + G. lalia, a form of speech]

echolalia

The involuntary, parrot-like repetition of words or phrases, spoken by another person. Echolalia may occur as a feature of schizophrenia or as part of a severe tic disorder.

Echolalia

Involuntary echoing of the last word, phrase, or sentence spoken by someone else or sound in the environment.
Mentioned in: Tourette Syndrome

ech·o·la·li·a

(ek'ō-lā'lē-ă)
Involuntary parrotlike repetition of something just spoken by another person.
[echo + G. lalia, a form of speech]
References in periodicals archive ?
Various researchers, including Luria (1980), have noted perseveration, stimulus bound behavior, echopraxia, and echolalia. According to Fuster (2001, 2002, 2008), the most general executive function of the lateral prefrontal cortex is temporal organization of goal-directed actions in the domains of behavior, cognition, and language.
What I'm trying to intimate is that when Nietzschean perspectivism is embraced, when the writer recognizes the in-adequacy of language and understanding to the world, artifact of the hermeneutic circle or what Kermode called in a different setting, the "genesis of secrecy," he approaches a new kind of transcendence: where the (un-honed) expressive echolalia, however noisome and unmanning, becomes sublimated into the life--something Miller hints at towards the end of his ecstatic experiences and ecstatic renderings of his (deontic) day of rest in Greece.
* common communication issues, such as echolalia and lack of eye contact
Affected individuals were mesmerized by objects but indifferent to people, often had feeding difficulties in infancy, reacted fearfully to loud sounds and other sharp sensory inputs, enacted peculiar rituals obsessively, possessed unusually restricted interests and, if they had language at all, routinely confused "I" and "you." Some displayed echolalia, repeating other people's words rather than communicating with words of their own.
The effects of echolalia on acquisition and generalization of receptive labeling in autistic children.
The show's title, "Echolalia," is a term denoting the either playful or neurotic reiteration of vocalizations made by another person.
What about autistic echolalia or Tourette Syndrome?
(xii) Tourette reportedly became interested in the phenomena after learning about the 'jumping Frenchmen of Maine', a cohort of people with perceptible startle reactions and echolalia. (Singer, 2005: p 149)
Such children may also use stereotypies or occasionally echolalia to make their speech seem fluent.
Thus echolalia, mimicking movie scripts, twirling objects, or flapping would count.
Five waiters burst through a wall "and serve up a cacophonous echolalia," as one publicity blurb puts it.