echoic


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echoic

(ĕ-kō′ik) [ echo + -ic]
1. Pert. to an echo.
2. Pert. to the imitation of a natural sound; onomatopoeic
References in periodicals archive ?
The cytologically malignant LNs were mostly hypoechoic or heterogeneously structured, particularly in the neck region; however, the absence of echoic hilum was not diagnostic of malignancy (29,30).
Mimicry training is essentially identical to echoic training, and consists of singing a note that is identical to a heard note.
When dealing with the establishment of the echoic repertoire, the usefulness of educational reinforcement is highlighted by the use of the mand "Say X", where X is the word to be echoed.
The procedure was divided into the following steps: (a) naming pre-test; (b) word echoic training and dictated word and picture relations; (c) equivalence class formation tests; and (d) naming post-test.
The results in Table 4 clearly document that a binary spectrogram mask does not allow a proper extraction of speech sources from real echoic mixtures.
The wonderfully echoic sounds of symbolizing and signifying enhance the parallel "as well as" prepositional phrases.
In it, the tube and the ovary can barely be distinguished, and US signs of abscess appear, among them low-level echoic fluid and linear echogenicity (FIGURE 4).
echoic, self-echoic, self-editing, problem solving, autoclitics) are discussed in Verbal Behavior, yet these topics remain severely under-investigated by researchers.
Informational and dialogue coordinating functions of prosodic features of Japanese echoic responses.
Since neither term appears to have any relevant meaning of its own, perhaps the phrase is simply echoic.
Bloom rightly underscores the extent to which echoic sound disrupts "the unity of voice, body, and subjectivity" (163) even as it eludes male attempts to control vocal production.