echinocandins

echinocandins

A class of lipopeptide antifungal drugs that act by inhibiting glucan synthesis, thereby damaging fungal cell walls. They are effective against Candida and Aspergillus species. Examples are caspofungin (Cancidas) and micafungin.
References in periodicals archive ?
The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) is defined as the minimum amount of drug that inhibits the growth of the organism.8 The standardised methods are present which provide the susceptibility of echinocandins against C.
The antifungal medication is further segmented into voriconazole, amphotericin B (AMB), itraconazole, caspofungin, echinocandins, and others.
The organism's resistance to triazole antifungal agents and, in some cases, amphotericin B has led to increased use of echinocandins; but there are reports that C.
On the basis of limited data available, echinocandins are recommended as initial therapy for C.
The available antifungals like azoles and echinocandins are costly and associated with some side effects so there is a need of some other compounds that have better anti-Candida effects (Bhattacharyya et al., 2013).
parapsilosis showed high MIC values for echinocandins, a recent antifungal class, (35) whereas A.
Rezafungin has improved pharmacokinetics compared to existing echinocandins and the potential for expanded utility across patient settings.
Among the 212 patients treated, fluconazole was the agent most frequently used (122 patients, 57.5%), followed by deoxycholate amphotericin B (56, 26.4%), echinocandins (11, 5.2%), and voriconazole (1 episode only).
These emerging species have become more important, since some have profiles of resistance to commonly used antifungal drugs, especially azoles and echinocandins (1).
has the potential to improve outcomes in this difficult-to-treat infection, and the distinct changes that SCY-078 induced in the cellular morphology of Candida strains, when compared to echinocandins, illustrate the differentiated effect of this novel triterpenoid antifungal compound, a critical feature when addressing the growing concern of multidrug-resistant fungal infections."
Even if the ESCMID recommendations for the therapeutic management of candidemia do not differentiate the therapeutic approach according to the species, meaning that as first line therapy a presumptive large spectrum antifungal drug (in practice echinocandins) can be used whatever is the causative species, rapid and accurate identification (ID) methods for fungal species causing invasive mycoses are crucial for a better management of high-risk patients and for an adequate treatment.
([paragraph]) The broth microdilution method was used for azoles and echinocandins and Etest for amphotericin B; susceptibility breakpoints used were those described by CDC.